2015 Audience Survey Results

The Festival, a place for experimentation and discovery, looks for feedback from our audience after our time together in June. This year, we sent out an electronic audience survey to 1,013 ticket buyers who attended this past Festival, and we received an overwhelming 40% response. For those who participated, we thank you for making the time to share such thoughtful evaluations about your experience.

As we continue to comb through the results and comments, we would like to share some initial findings. Please see below for responses to our survey. We will keep you posted as additional 2016 Festival details become available, and look forward to welcoming you back to Ojai once again.

In the meantime, and to address one area of concern that was raised by many of you, we will be including more space in next year’s Festival schedule for meals, reflection, and connection.


Where audience members are coming from:Respondent Geographic Origin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ages of survey respondents:
Respondent Age

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of tickets did you purchase?
Respondent Tickets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is this your first year at the Festival?
Respondent New and Returning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are new, how did you hear about the Festival?Learning About the Festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are returning, which past Festivals have you attended?
Returning Festivals Attended

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why do you donate to the Festival?
Reasons for Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please rate your Festival experience: Festival Experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Will you be returning for the 2016 Festival with Music Director Peter Sellars?
Returning in 2016

 

 

 

 

 


MEMORABLE MOMENTS…

Survey respondents also shared their memorable moments from the 2015 Festival. Here is a selection from both returning and new ticket buyers. Thank you for participating in our survey!

“…the late afternoon ambiance and the final musical piece of two pianos and two percussionists…soothing to the soul.”

“As first-timers, we anticipated adventure and found it at every event that we attended, however, the free performance of Sila was easily the most memorable of the Festival and among the most memorable of our lifetimes.”

“Conversations with new friends seating next to me, we shared emotions and discoveries.”

“No one thing, just old friends, new music, familiar music in fresh presentations, and walking the trail to the bowl.”

“In the Sunday morning concert, the piece Sulvasutra really got intense – almost like a good Grateful Dead Jam.”

“The John Luther Adams experience in the park on Thursday afternoon was stunning, to be enveloped in the sounds.”

“We don’t resonate to all of contemporary music, but we don’t mind being stretched. What Ojai does provide is many special moments of musical intimacy between the listener and artist such as Messiaen’s Visions de l’amen, Schick’s energetic display of the art of percussion and all of Wu Man’s performances.”

“The whole experience is fascinating and mind expanding, so it’s not any one performance or part, but the whole.”

 


Relive the Festival with our live streaming >>
Take a refresher course with OjaiU >>
Read the 2015 reviews >>
Purchase your 2016 series passes >>

You Make It Happen – Support The Festival Today

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Music enthusiasts from across the globe gathered in Ojai last week for performances that critics applauded as “sensational,” “magisterial,” and “beyond-flabbergasting.”

Thanks to an open-minded community of audience members and dedicated volunteers, the Festival achieved an atmosphere of musical adventure highlighted by:

  • Music Director Steven Schick’s boundless energy and incredible versatility, performing in and conducting almost in a dozen concerts over the course of five days
  • An audience for live streamed events of more than 5,800 viewers from 74 countries
  • Close to 3,000 people attended free community events and late night concerts, including the mesmerizing West Coast premiere of John Luther Adam’s Sila: The Breath of the World in Libbey Park

All of this is made possible by contributions from generous people like you, who believe in the power of music to transform a community into a refuge from our daily concerns, where extraordinary experiences are shared by artists and audiences.

Please consider making a gift by July 31st, the final date of our 69th season. Your commitment is what keeps the Festival strong and makes it possible for us to continue to stake a claim for the new, the curious, the visionary and the path breaking.

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2016 Music Director Peter Sellars Frames Programming for 70th Festival

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The Ojai Music Festival marks its 70th year in 2016 and to curate this milestone, Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris has invited opera and theater director Peter Sellars to serve as Music Director. For the 2016 Festival, Peter Sellars is shaping a program deeply rooted in the cultures of Ojai, starting new traditions and setting out fresh agendas for the 70 years to come. The Festival will take place June 9-12, 2016.

As the 69th Ojai Music Festival opens this week (June 10-14, 2015) with Music Director Steven Schick, the Festival’s 2016 Music Director Peter Sellars shares thoughts on his distinctive approach to programming the Festival:

The Ojai Valley has long been recognized as a rare and beautiful natural site that invites retreat, renewal, and regeneration, from Chumash ceremonial life to Krishnamurti’s legendary talks under the trees. The valley has both grandeur and a human scale that inspire and allow the deepest human questions to resonate, and create a setting for the most personal search for answers. The magical play of light across the canyon and the heady aroma of orange blossoms bring the senses to life, awaken the mind, and create a profound aura of openness and well-being.

Music incites many of the same thoughts and emotions, with similar immensity and intimacy and awe. The 70th Ojai Music Festival will gather this powerful energy and spirit of inquiry and reflection into a weekend of peak experiences and secret revelations.

For the first time the composer Kaija Saariaho will come to Ojai. We will feature two of her most potent and visionary works. Her new chamber version of ‘The Passion of Simone’, a meditation on the life of the courageous French philosopher Simone Weil, written to a wise and humane text by Amin Maalouf, will receive its American premiere with the extraordinary young soprano Julia Bullock. It is a work of startling integrity and permanent challenge in dark times, with a flame of hope that burns brightly and intensely in the darkness.

Kaija Saariaho’s newest operatic creation is a sequence of two Japanese Noh plays in English versions by Ezra Pound, entitled ‘Only the Sound Remains’. Again Ojai will offer the American premiere. These two plays will be performed in the tradition of Japanese Takigi Noh in the amphitheater at the Ojai Valley School Upper Campus, lightly held in the gentle grasp of a protective arroyo under a radiant early morning sky for ‘The Feather Mantle’, a play of illumination, transcendence and evanescence, and just before midnight under an intense starlit sky for ‘Always Strong’, the harrowing and haunted story of a young warrior’s spirit struggling to return to life on earth.

From Tahrir Square in Cairo, Dina El Wedidi and her band come to America to present a new song cycle that paints a personal picture of the realities, aspirations, disappointments, and determination of the Egyptian revolution. Dina El Wedidi epitomizes the new Egyptian women of a rising generation, her gorgeous and unmistakable voice alive with courage, allure, and the breath of freedom. Her band includes traditional Egyptian and modern electronic instruments, and for these performances she will bring three extraordinary older women from the Egyptian zār tradition who are singing in full-throated solidarity with the activism and vision of Dina and her generation.

Julia Bullock will also be the center of a unique and poignant evening honoring the brilliance, daring, public courage, and private tragedies of Josephine Baker, the black icon who created a declaration of independence with her black body, and blazed a trail of irresistible challenge and charm in France in the same years that Simone Weil pursued her feminist vigil on behalf of a larger humanity. Our Ojai evening will be a very personal portrait of a fearless civil rights pioneer and visionary who paid dearly for every forward step. And kept stepping.

The final Sunday of the 2016 festival will shift into an exuberant children’s festival for the first part of the day, featuring music written and performed by, with, and for children and anyone who is ready to listen to the world with fresh ears. Those programs will then expand and flow into a huge street party culminating in sheer communal pleasure, the joy of improvisation, increasingly wild juxtapositions, spontaneous jam sessions and very, very good times.

Among the featured artists at the 70th edition of the Ojai Music Festival, we are extremely pleased and proud to welcome, in addition to ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble), Roomful of Teeth, the path breaking vocal collective, participating in the Kaija Saariaho premieres and surprising new works written for and developed by the group. Classical Indian music will be performed in breathtaking settings at specific times of day to reflect the shifting of the light, and films will be screened during those times when we crave the dark. Talks and lectures that illuminate and amplify our current history with cultural and philosophical perspectives will alternate with sessions focused on spiritual thinkers offering quieter moments of contemplation and peace.

The Ojai Valley sunrises and sunsets will do the rest.

–2016 Music Director Peter Sellars

Mr. Morris said, “Peter Sellars, no stranger to Ojai, is a true visionary, and I can think of no better person to lead the Festival’s 70th anniversary. Peter has devised a truly distinctive festival that embraces his vast knowledge and deep commitment to social issues of our time, along with his deep love of Ojai. It will be an audacious experience that includes thrilling music in unusual settings, the greatest of artists, contextual discussions to frame and amplify the music, and provocative films to further enrich our mutual adventure.”

Mr. Sellars is one of the most innovative and powerful forces in the arts, both in America and abroad. His partnership with Ojai dates back to 1992 when he directed a daring version of Stravinsky’s Histoire du soldat with that Festival’s Music Director Pierre Boulez. Mr. Sellars returned to Ojai in 2011, with Music Director Dawn Upshaw, to direct the critically acclaimed world premiere of the staged production of George Crumb’s The Winds of Destiny.

Read Peter Sellar’s bio >>
Read Artist bios >>
Read the full press release >>

Purchase 2016 series passes online >>
Download the 2016 order form >>

2015 Festival Reviews

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The Ojai Music Festival was a colorful and continuous mix of music, conversation, gatherings, and surprises — a total of more than 32 offerings, which added up to one unforgettable Festival.

You can relive the 2015 Festival anytime by watching our archive live streaming concerts, Ojai Talks, and interview intermissions online. Click here >>

Read excerpts of reviews below. We will add more as they come in!
Or download a pdf version here >>


 

Feeling the sonic rush at the Ojai Music Festival
Schick did not go so far as to propose compatibility and cohabitation as a festival theme. But by packing the 69th Ojai festival into marathon days of concerts from dawn (and before!) until midnight, he, in fact, turned the five-day festival into a de-facto Davos of musical diplomacy. No model society emerged, but there were helpful hints of how we might proceed.

– Los Angeles Times

Read more >>


The Ojai Music Festival Marches to a New Beat
Bending and melding genres is an Ojai tradition, but rarely have they been stretched so far.

– Wall Street Journal

Read more >>


Schick happens in Ojai
The Ojai Music Festival has always been friendly to influences from outside the Western tradition, but this year’s edition took things a step further by ushering in so much of the so-called “outside” as to render the distinction temporarily invalid.

– Santa Barbara Independent

Read more >>


Percussionist Steven Schick makes Ojai Music Festival his own
he [Steven Schick] turned in what will certainly be one of the 69th annual event’s defining concerts, a solo percussion recital as the sun went down and the cool night air rolled into Libbey Bowl.

– Orange County Register

Read more >>


Ojai Music Festival shows off its percussion power
The 69th Ojai Music Festival, which runs through Sunday under the inspired leadership of percussionist/composer/educator Steven Schick, is making a widespread and deep impression exploring the musical potential of sounds

– Ventura County Star


Morning Glories at Ojai Music Festival
One of the delights of an event like the Ojai Music Festival, with its myriad performances of 20th and 21st century music, is encountering surprises, especially early in the morning.

– The San Diego Union-Tribune

Read more >>


Ojai Music Festival celebrates icon Pierre Boulez’s 90th birthday
The Ojai Music Festival is a different story. Although Boulez has had a major presence in the U.S., notably as music director of the New York Philharmonic in the 1970s, Ojai served as his most consistent American musical and spiritual haven. He was music director seven times between 1967 and 2003.

– Los Angeles Times

Read more >>


Ojai Festival, Not for the Faint of Heart
Morris called this year’s five-day festival an “immersive experience,” but new- music boot camp might be more accurate. Of the 49 composers represented, 28 were new to Ojai, including Arab-American composer Mohammed Fairouz and Julia Wolfe, who in April won the Pulitzer Prize for her oratorio, Anthracite Fields. That’s a lot of ground to cover.

– Musical America


The director also drums
It was a tall, wide, sleep- and dinner-challenged order of a task, but Mr. Schick and company worked wonders here, in what was one of the smartest, edgiest and funnest Ojai Music Festival programs in the past decade.

– Santa Barbara News Press


Outsiders – The Ojai Music Festival
To attend Ojai is to enter a happily topsy-turvy world where longtime patrons are as avid for new music as they are for classic repertory. Works are sometimes criticized for being too accessible . . .  What is different about Ojai? It has to do, I think, simply with the power of consistency: the festival stuck to its mission, year after year, decade after decade, until, at some point, its ideal audience became the real one.
– Alex Ross for The New Yorker

Read more >>


 

Relive the 2015 Festival through our photo gallery

Thank you for joining us for an incredibly memorable week of adventurous music making and community. Relive the moments with our 2015 Festival photo galleries of concerts and scenes from around Libbey Bowl – click a thumbnail below to view larger versions.

 

Festival Concerts

 

Around the 2015 Festival

 

Ojai Music Festival and WQXR’s Q2 Music Launch Partnership

Q2_400x400Q2 Music and the Ojai Music Festival are partnering to bring you on-demand audio from past Festivals, as well as a five-part series of festival concert audio hosted by noted choreographer and 2013 Ojai music director Mark Morris.

Listen to episodes from the series, hosted by Mark Morris, below and hear full recordings from the Festival here >>

Learn more about the Festival’s partnership with Q2 >>

Q2 Music is WQXR’s online music station dedicated to contemporary classical composers, innovative ensembles, and vibrant, live webcasts from New York City’s leading new-music venues. Q2 Music programming includes immersive festivals, insightful commentary from hosts including composer Phil Kline and vocalist Helga Davis, full-length album streams, exclusive concert audio from local and national venues, and special events in front of live audiences at The Greene Space at WQXR. Q2 Music produces ‘Meet the Composer’ with host Nadia Sirota, a podcast which mines the brains of today’s leading composers. Q2 Music lives online at www.wqxr.org/q2music, where one can find a 24/7 stream of the best in late 20th and 21st century classical music, playlist information, and on-demand audio. WQXR, the nation’s most listened-to classical music station, also makes Q2 Music available via the free WQXR App.

Listen to KUSC’s 2015 Festival Preview with Gail Eichenthal & Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris

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With only days to go before the Festival begins, get ready by listening to the Festival Preview podcast from KUSC. Featuring host Gail Eichenthal and Festival Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris, learn about the Festival’s very first percussionist Music Director and what he has in store for audiences.

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Listen online here >>

John Luther Adams on “Sila: The Breath of the World”

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John Luther Adams at the 2013 performance of ‘Strange and Sacred Noise’ at Besant Hill School.

Composer John Luther Adams is no stranger to Ojai, with performances of his works in 2012 and 2013, including the ‘Inuksuit‘, featuring musicians placed throughout Libbey Park. Adams returns to Ojai this year for the West Coast Premiere of his new work ‘Sila: The Breath of the World’. Here he discusses the genesis of the piece and the significant differences in pieces written to be performed and heard outdoors.

“Songs are thoughts which are sung out with the breath when people let
themselves be moved by a great force…”
– Orpingalik, a Netsilik elder

In Inuit tradition the spirit that animates all things is sila, the breath of
the world. Sila is the wind and the weather, the forces of nature. But
it’s also something more. Sila is intelligence. It’s consciousness. It’s
our awareness of the world around us, and the world’s awareness of
us.

Over the past four decades most of my music has been inspired by the
outdoors, but heard indoors. With Inuksuit – for nine to ninety-nine
percussionists – I finally composed music intended from the start to be
performed and heard outdoors. In Sila: The Breath of the World, I
continue this exploration with a full orchestral palette.

Listening to music indoors, we usually try to ignore the outside world,
focusing our listening on a limited range of sounds. Listening outdoors
we’re challenged to expand our attention to encompass a multiplicity
of sounds. We’re invited to receive messages not only from the
composer and the performers, but also from the larger world around
us.

In Sila the musicians are dispersed widely throughout a large
performance space. Listeners, too, are free to move around and
discover their own individual listening points. Listening carefully to the
counterpoint between the composed music of Sila and the never-ending
music of the performance site, we transform seemingly empty
space into more fully experienced place.

Sila is intended for performance outdoors by 16 to 80 musicians, or
more. The performance materials include scores and parts for five
different ensembles of woodwinds, brass, percussion, strings and
voices. These five ensembles may perform Sila in any combination,
successively or simultaneously, in the same space or separate spaces.
At Ojai, for the West Coast premiere, we present the full orchestral
version of the piece.

Sila comes out of the earth and rises to the sky. The piece traverses
sixteen harmonic clouds, grounded on the first sixteen harmonics of a
low B-flat. All the other tones in the music fall “between the cracks” of
the piano keyboard – off the grid of twelve-tone equal temperament.
Like the tuning, the flow of musical time in Sila is also off the grid.
There is no conductor. Each musician is a soloist who plays or sings a
unique part at her or his own pace. The sequence of musical events is
composed, but the length of each event is flexible. The music
breathes.

A performance of Sila lasts approximately 70 minutes. There is no
clearly demarcated ending. As the music of the performance gradually
dissolves into the larger sonic landscape, the musicians join the
audience in listening to the continuing music of the place.

John Luther Adams

Join us for the West Coast Premiere of Sila: The Breath of the World
Thursday, June 11 | 3:30-4:45pm – Libbey Park
Free Community Event

Hear John Luther Adams’ Become River at the Saturday Late Night Concert
Saturday, June 13 | 10:30pm – Libbey Bowl
Free – Tickets required

Ojai & Site-Determination by Ross Karre, ICE percussionist and Director of Production

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ICE’s Phyllis Chen and Ross Karre organized a site-determined version of Alvin Lucier’s Opera for Objects against the backdrop of the arctic horizon near Ilulissat, Greenland. The metronomic rhythm served as an arresting reminder of the ticking timer of arctic glaciers, currently melting at unprecedented rates.

Site-specificity is a common term in art production circles. I think most artists and audiences have a basic understanding of what it means. But I find site-specificity to be a glorification of a process which is required of all good art. Nothing is created in a vacuum. Nothing is presented in a vacuum. The site/context matters. All works are site specific by default but the process of creatively optimizing a work via its context can be the difference between a good realization and a bad one. A performance can either attempt to beat its head against the boundaries of a context or it can ask a simple question, “What changes do I make to this piece to transcribe it for this place?”

It’s a question we’ve been asking from the very first brainstorming sessions for the Ojai Festival programming and production. Whether it’s the Libbey Bowl presentations of intricate sequences of Boulez, Varèse, and Xenakis or the works of John Luther Adams in the park, every program must ask the question.

The answers aren’t always obvious. And some works lend themselves to subtle (or drastic) changes to create a symbiotic relationship between piece and place. In Pauline Oliveros’ works, space and sound are codependent variables. The scores are open and flexible enough to allow extemporaneous performance decisions which are guided by the space: its reverberations, its noise floor, and its general ambiance. From one interpretation to the next, a space may have a more profound impact on a performance than the instrumentation itself! (Note the radical differences in each performance of George Lewis’ Artificial Life on digitice.org, ICE’s digital media library.)

For Anna Thorvaldsdóttir’s In the Light of Air, ICE specifically encouraged Anna to make a piece which would be redefined in each new space. In Ojai, we will install her work in the intimate Zalk Theater such that its doors which overlook the valley become a dramatic lighting design element. It will be a sublime juxtaposition of piece and place!

But it is in John Luther Adams works where I find I have the greatest curiosity about this relationship. In 2009 I had the great fortune of working with John on the premiere of his Inuksuit in the Banff National Forest. On the heels of his experiences with Rob Esler in sites in the southern California desert and the Alaskan Tundra, Steven Schick asked John to create an outdoor percussion work which has since been performed and recorded in dozens of sites around the world–from the Park Avenue Armory to Australia. While at Banff, John lead numerous discussions about the opportunities and perils of site-specific work. He even coined (or introduced to me) a term which I have since used to represent this type of context-based interpretation: site-determined work. I like that term because it implies that the nature of the work itself will be determined by site at hand and successive performance sites. In the case of Inuksuit and Sila, the site fundamentally determines two of the most important parameters in the piece: the distribution of the performers and the resulting balances of visual and auditory stimulus.

But non-traditional site determination comes with doubts and pitfalls. To those in the sonic vicinity of the performance who are unaware of the event’s existence, how do they distinguish between John’s carefully crafted sonic phenomena and noise pollution? For the hiker enjoying the Banff National Park, how are they to know that the hand crank sirens aren’t a signal for the end of days? I guess the answer to both of these questions is, “they don’t.” And that’s a problem. But a bigger problem is humanity’s inability to garner an awareness, respect, and appreciation for their natural surroundings. For those experiencing these monumental works on the periphery of Ojai’s parks or the trails in Banff, the magic occurs as the works fade to reveal (and draw stark attention to) the greatest site-specific work ever created: nature and our ecosystem. It is in this reveal that John creates the greatest advocacy for the environment he loves so deeply. My own appreciation of nature has never been more intensely brought to the fore than in the moment when glockenspiel bird calls cross-faded with native Banff birds. I look forward to finding out what Sila will reveal about the central coast of California and the magic of the site of Ojai.

– Ross Karre, ICE percussionist and Director of Production

Happy Anniversary HumanArts!

The Ojai Music Festival is fortunate to be part of a strong community of residents and businesses supporting the arts in the Ojai Valley. One of our longtime friends is HumanArts Gallery located in the downtown Arcade. Owners Hallie and Stan Katz share their story of how intertwined the Festival is with their move to Ojai.

Running_Ridge_GroupIt was May 30, 1975 and most of the action was in Libbey Park where Michael Tilson Thomas was preparing to conduct the Ojai Music Festival. In a much smaller venue across the street there was another buzz happening — a new gallery in town was hosting its grand opening –- it was one of the only galleries in town at that time! Three couples, fairly new to town, decided to show an eclectic mix of pottery, jewelry, paintings, and sculpture, some of which they themselves made.

Truly one of the first places dedicated to contemporary fine craft in Southern California, it was known then as Running Ridge Gallery. The original partners were Bob and Barbara Grabowski, Bob’s sister Ruth Farnham and her husband John, and Jett and Sharon Spencer. Bob, Jett, and Sharon made jewelry; Ruth was a painter; and John was a sculptor. Barbara was the business manager.

RR Early Interior#1Ojai and the patrons of the Music Festival that year welcomed the new little gallery and it hummed along nicely for five years until the Spencers wanted to leave Ojai.   Good friends of the partners from LA, Hallie and Stan Katz, were asked if they would like to move to Ojai and join in this endeavor, taking the Spencers’ place. Hallie and Stan owned a jewelry school and gallery on Ventura Boulevard in Studio City, and they were ready for a quieter life style with more focus on the gallery business and designing their own jewelry. So this was a good move, as it gave them more freedom to exhibit in shows around the country, taking turns with partners to run the shop.

Gallery Counter #15It was a very successful partnership for ten more years, and then the Grabowski’s wanted to move to Idaho. Ruth and John were ready to get out of the ‘retail’ game. So Hallie and Stan bought out the partners in 1990, and changed the name to HumanArts Gallery. The rest is history, as they say.

Fast forward to the present – it’s coming up on June 2015 and Hallie and Stan are celebrating the 40th year of the gallery’s presence on Ojai Avenue, the anniversary falling at the same time as the Ojai Music Festival kicks off each year. The Gallery resided in its original building on the Arcade walk-through until 2008, when it moved to a much bigger space eight doors west, directly across from Libbey Park. Incorporating handmade furniture and home accessories, Stan and Hallie now represent about 150 artists from all over the U.S., including 20 who are local.

H & S,New Cabinets #16HumanArts has become an arts destination for many loyal fans, the first stop for many when they arrive in town. It’s also on the radar for local supporters when they need a gift or an especially artful treat for themselves. Hallie continues to make custom jewelry, mostly unique wedding rings, and Stan oversees the running of the shop. You can still find them there on the weekends to welcome you and tell stories about the many wonderful artists they represent and how Ojai is still the same paradise they discovered all those years ago.

Human Arts Gallery 
246 E. Ojai Ave. Ojai, CA 93023
805 646-1525

Ojai Music Festival Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris Announces Future Music Directors

Peter Sellars: 70th Festival June 9-12, 2016 | Vijay Iyer: 71st Festival June 8-11, 2017 | Esa-Pekka Salonen: 72nd Festival June 7-10, 2018

Over almost seven decades, the Ojai Music Festival has had a reputation as a creative laboratory for both artists and audiences. Deeply committed to nurturing experiences that can only be rendered through innovation, creativity and risk-taking in its programming, Ojai is an intense, involving and immersive weekend of music, discussion, and community, all in the sublime setting of Ojai. Peter Sellars, Vijay Iyer and Esa-Pekka Salonen are the perfect musical visionaries to propel Ojai into its next 70 years. – Thomas W. Morris, Artistic Director

(April 14, 2015, Ojai, California) — As the Ojai Music Festival anticipates the upcoming 69th Festival (June 10-14) with Music Director Steven Schick, Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris announced the artists who will serve as Music Directors in the coming years: Peter Sellars (June 9-12, 2016), Vijay Iyer (June 8-11, 2017), and Esa-Pekka Salonen (June 7-10, 2018). Since the late 1940’s, the Ojai Music Festival’s tradition has been to welcome a new Music Director each year to ensure vitality and diversity in programming across Festivals.

The Ojai Music Festival marks its 70th year in 2016, and to curate this milestone, Mr. Morris has invited opera and theater director Peter Sellars to serve as Music Director. Mr. Sellars’ partnership with Ojai dates back to 1992 when he directed a daring version of Stravinsky’s Histoire du soldat with Music
Director Pierre Boulez. He returned to Ojai in 2011 to direct the critically acclaimed world premiere of the staged production of George Crumb’s The Winds of Destiny with Music Director Dawn Upshaw.

For the 2016 Festival, Peter Sellars is shaping a program that is deeply rooted in the cultures of Ojai, starting some new traditions and setting out some fresh agendas for the 70 years to come. Mr. Sellars is one of the most innovative and powerful forces in the arts, both in America and abroad. A visionary, he is known for ground-breaking interpretations of classic works. Whether Mozart, Handel, Shakespeare, Sophocles, or the 16th-century Chinese playwright Tang Xianzu, he strikes a universal chord with audiences, engaging and illuminating contemporary social and political issues. Mr. Sellars has staged operas in major opera houses throughout the world and has established a reputation for bringing 20th-century and contemporary operas to the stage. He has also led several major arts festivals, including the 1990 and 1993 Los Angeles Festivals. Initial plans for the 2016 Festival will be announced in May 2015.

The 2017 Festival introduces composer-pianist Vijay Iyer (pronounced “VID-jay EYE-yer”) as Music Director. Mr. Iyer, a Grammy nominated polymath whose career has spanned the arts, the humanities, and the sciences, was named Downbeat magazine’s 2014 Pianist of the Year, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow, and a 2012 Doris Duke Performing Artist. As The New York Times observed, “There’s probably no frame wide enough to encompass the creative output of the pianist Vijay Iyer.” Mr. Iyer is the Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts in the Department of Music at Harvard University, and the director of the Banff International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music. As a composer he has had works commissioned and premiered by Arturo O’Farrill’s Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra, American Composers Orchestra, Bang on a Can All-Stars, Brentano Quartet, Brooklyn Rider, Imani Winds, International Contemporary Ensemble, violinist Jennifer Koh, and Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble. Publisher Schott Music has said, “Vijay Iyer is a polymath in the truest sense of the word. He is a leader across a wide range of disciplines, but his extraordinary talent as a pianist and composer has caught the world’s attention and led to an impressive array of creative collaborations with filmmakers, choreographers, orchestras, chamber and new music ensembles.”

Conductor and composer Esa-Pekka Salonen returns to Ojai in 2018 as Music Director. (This information has been updated from a previously announced plan that showed Mr. Salonen returning to Ojai in 2017.) One of today’s foremost artists, Mr. Salonen made his Ojai debut as Music Director in 1999 with composer-in-residence Magnus Lindberg in a program dedicated to Finnish music, and later returned in 2001 to serve again as music director. Mr. Salonen is currently the principal conductor and artistic advisor for London’s Philharmonia Orchestra, the conductor laureate for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where he served as music director for 17 years, and the first-ever creative chair at the Tonhalle Orchestra in Zurich. Through his unwavering dedication to new music and technology, he is a revitalizing force, striving to bring the symphony orchestra into the 21st century. His compositions move freely between contemporary idioms, combining intricacy and technical virtuosity with playful rhythmic and melodic innovations. Mr. Salonen’s Floof and LA Variations have become modern classics, and his newest compositions are performed around the globe. It was recently announced that Mr. Salonen will serve as composer-in-residence of the New York Philharmonic for the next three seasons.

Thomas W. Morris, Artistic Director
Thomas W. Morris was appointed Artistic Director of the Ojai Music Festival starting with the 2004

Festival and will provide artistic direction through the 75th Festival in 2021. Mr. Morris is recognized as one of the most innovative leaders in the orchestra industry and served as the long-time chief executive of both The Cleveland Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He is currently active nationally and internationally as a consultant, lecturer, teacher, and writer.

As Artistic Director of the 69-year-old Festival, Mr. Morris is responsible for artistic planning and each year appoints a music director with whom he collaborates on shaping the Festival’s programming.

During his decade-long tenure, audiences have increased and the scope of the Festival has expanded, most recently to include a collaborative partnership, Ojai at Berkeley, with Cal Performances at UC Berkeley.

Mr. Morris was a founding director of Spring for Music and served as the project’s artistic director. He currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Curtis Institute of Music and as chair of its Board of Overseers, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He is also an accomplished percussionist.

Ojai Music Festival
From its founding in 1947, the Ojai Music Festival has created a place for groundbreaking musical experiences, bringing together innovative artists and curious audiences in an intimate, idyllic setting 80 miles northwest of Los Angeles. The Festival presents broad-ranging programs in unusual ways with an eclectic mix of rarely performed music, refreshing juxtapositions of musical styles, and music by today’s composers. The four-day festival is a complete immersive experience with concerts, free community events, symposia, film screenings, and gatherings. Considered a highlight of the summer season, Ojai has remained a leader in the classical music landscape.

The Ojai Music Festival attracts the world’s greatest musical artists. Through its unique structure of the Artistic Director appointing an annual Music Director, Ojai has presented a “who’s who” of music including: Aaron Copland, Igor Stravinsky, Olivier Messiaen, Michael Tilson Thomas, Kent Nagano, Pierre Boulez, John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Spano, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, David Robertson, eighth blackbird, George Benjamin, Dawn Upshaw, Leif Ove Andsnes, Mark Morris, Jeremy Denk, and Steven Schick.

Participation in the 2015 Ojai Music Festival
The Ojai Music Festival continues to draw thousands of curious and engaged music enthusiasts from across the country and has had record sell-out concerts over the last three years. As tickets remain in high demand, Ojai now includes virtual opportunities to participate in the Festival experience through live video streaming of concerts. The Festival promotes year-round participation and deeper engagement through its free online courses, OjaiU, which launched in May 2013 and remains active via archives on the Festival website. OjaiU returns on May 11 with four online sessions led by 2015 Music Director Steven Schick. To register, visit OjaiU.org.
Single Tickets
2015 Ojai Music Festival single tickets are now on sale online at OjaiFestival.org or by calling (805) 646-2053. Tickets start at $40 for reserved seating, lawn tickets at $15, and $45 for Ojai Talks.
Directions to Ojai and Libbey Bowl, as well as information about lodging, concierge services for visitors and other Ojai activities, are also available on the Festival website. Follow Festival updates at
OjaiFestival.org, Facebook (Facebook.com/ojaifestival), and Twitter (@ojaifestivals).

 

Happy 90th Birthday Pierre Boulez!

Boulez 2003 by Frank Bott

Boulez in Ojai (2003). Photo credit: Frank Bott

 

Happy 90th Birthday to Pierre Boulez! We’re kicking off our celebrations by unveiling our Boulez In Ojai timeline – it’s a work in progress and we’ll be adding new photos and material in the coming weeks. Don’t forget to get your tickets to the Wednesday, June 10th Boulez At 90 event, featuring the West Coast Premiere of Beyond the Score® A Pierre Dream: A Portrait of Pierre Boulez.

View the Boulez in Ojai timeline here >>

Read more on Boulez At 90 >>

2015 Ojai Eats Schedule And Tickets


omf_supper_022

An important part of the Festival experience is mingling and dining with other Festival guests. With the concentration of concerts, talks, and events, we’ve created various opportunities for you to enjoy. View the menu for suppers in the park below and see the full schedule here >>

SUPPERS IN THE PARK

Between the evening concert parts, enjoy a family-style supper in Libbey Park, catered by The Simple Gourmet Kitchen. Order your gourmet boxed dinner online when you purchase your tickets. Meal includes dinner, dessert, and wine from Ojai Vineyard. $40/person per night.

Friday, June 12 Supper Menu
Grilled Ginger-Marinated Salmon with Fresh Mint Chutney
Pearl Couscous with Honey Roasted Carrots and Toasted Almonds
Marinated Cucumber Salad with Feta & Herbs
Brownies with Dark Chocolate Chips

Vegan Option
Grilled Ginger-Marinated Tofu with Fresh Mint Chutney
Pearl Couscous with Honey Roasted Carrots and Toasted Almonds
Marinated Cucumber Salad with Feta & Herbs
Vegan Coconut Pudding Cup

Gluten-Free Option
Grilled Ginger-Marinated Salmon with Fresh Mint Chutney
Quinoa with Honey Roasted Carrots and Toasted Almonds
Marinated Cucumber Salad with Feta & Herbs
Gluten-Free Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Brownies

Saturday, June 13 Supper Menu
Coconut-Lime Thai Noodles with Chicken and Herbs
Miso-Honey Roast Sweet Potatoes
Sesame Slaw with Edamame, Scallions, Carrots & Cucumber
Olive Oil Spice Cake with Citrus Glaze

Vegan Option
Coconut-Lime Thai Noodles with Tamari Roast Mushrooms & Herbs
Miso-Honey Roast Sweet Potatoes
Sesame Slaw with Edamame, Scallions, Carrots & Cucumber
Vegan Molasses Spice Cookie

Gluten-Free Option
Coconut-Lime Thai Rice Noodles with Chicken and Herbs
Miso-Honey Roast Sweet Potatoes
Sesame Slaw with Edamame, Scallions, Carrots & Cucumber
Gluten Free Olive Oil Spice Cake with Citrus Glaze

Order suppers online here >>

Read more about Ojai Eats and view participating area restaurants >>

April is Ojai Pixie Tangerine Month – Celebrate With A Unique Ojai Activity!

OVB_PixieMonthLogo_2014Final_WebApril is Pixie Tangerine Month and there are a host of happenings dedicated to the sweet and seedless tangerine that are unique to the Ojai Valley. Pixies are small, sweet, and easy to eat – a local favorite for young and old alike. First grown in Ojai in the 1960’s, today there are over 25,000 pixie trees tended by more than 40 tangerine growers.

The Ojai Music Festival is celebrating with a special Pixie Pass: Get 10% off when you buy 2 concerts. Buy online and use promo code PIXIE10

Pixie-Pass-Coupon

From special pixie themed meals to orchard and bicycle tours, celebrate Pixie Tangerine Month with a unique Ojai activity, a Pixie-inspired meal, spa treatments, shopping discounts, and special lodging packages:

ACTIVITIES

  • Celebrate Pixie Season with Cloud Climber Jeep Tours (805 646 3200) – See exclusive vistas and a birds-eye view of the beautiful patchwork of Ojai’s citrus groves. Tour the Regalo Estate and sample a variety of citrus-flavored vinegars and local olive oils. All from a custom, open-air, canopy-covered Jeep led by a professional local driver and guide.
    Tours offered in April 2015, Wednesday – Sunday (based on availability) | $350 per jeep (up to 6 passengers)
  • Pixie Tours at Friends Ranch (15150 Maricopa Hwy | 805 646 2871) – Tour a local Pixie Orchard – learn about the growing of Pixies and visit the packing house.
    April 1, 4, and 18th, 2015 | $8 (children), $12 (adults)
    Packing house also open Tues – Fri, 7am-12pm
  • Ojai Pixie Squeeze Cooking Class at Lavender Inn (210 E Matilija St | 805 646 6635) – Learn how to incorporate Ojai Pixies into every course in a meal using simple recipes at the Ojai Pixie Squeeze Cooking Class. Includes a five-course meal.
    April 12, 2015: 1-2pm
  • Celebrate Ojai Pixie Month with Ojai Music Festival (201 S. Signal St | 805 646 2053) – Purchase tickets to any two concerts for the Ojai Music Festival (June 10-14, 2015), and receive 10% off your total order.
    Use promo code PIXIE10 online at www.OjaiFestival.org or by calling 805 646 2053. Offer valid April 1 – April 30, 2015.
  • Ojai Tennis Tournament (805 646 7241) – The 115th Ojai Tournament (April 22-26, 2015) will give away Pixies to spectators and have them on display throughout Libbey Park.
  • Third Fridays at OVA Arts (108 B N. Signal St | 805 646 5682) – OVA Arts invites guests to celebrate Ojai Pixie month at their Third Fridays event. During the evening, there will be an art contest for local artists, a raffle, small bites, wine, and live music.
    April 17, 2015
  • Pixie Orchard Tours with The Mob Shop (110 W Ojai Ave | 805 272 8102) – The Mob Shop, a full-service bike shop in Ojai, will offer scenic bike rides throughout Ojai’s Pixie orchards, electric bikes are available upon request.
    For more information on guided bike rides during Ojai Pixie Month, please call: (805) 272-8102
  • “Pix-ology” Cocktail Class at Ojai Valley Inn & Spa (905 Country Club Rd. | 855 697 8780) – Ojai Valley Inn & Spa’s popular mixology classes will take a Pixie theme during Ojai Pixie Month. Led by the award-winning bartending team at Jimmy’s Pub, the class includes a sampling of two cocktails, and a guided demonstration of creating
    Pixie cocktails.
    Every Friday in April: 4:30-5pm | $25 per person
  • Pixie Cooking Demonstration at Ojai Valley Inn & Spa (905 Country Club Rd. | 855 697 8780) – Chef de Cuisine Jaison Burke and Chef Tournant Dana Francisco, are teaming up for an unforgettable evening to showcase creative ways to cook with Pixies. The evening includes a cooking demonstration, a three-course meal with wine
    pairings, and a Champagne reception.
    April 25, 2015: 6-8pm | $90 per person
  • Pixie Art Contest at Porch Gallery (310 E. Ojai Ave | 805 620 7589) – Porch Gallery will hold an art contest for local artists called, “Ojai Pixies: What do they mean to you?” Works of photography, painting, illustration and print-making will be juried, and the winning piece will be available for sale at Porch Gallery.
    Submissions will be accepted from March 26 -March 28, 2015; the contest winner will be announced on March 29, 2015.

CULINARY

  • Azu Restaurant (457 E. Ojai Ave. | 805 640 7987) – Throughout the month of April, Azu will feature a Pixie Fizz cocktail and other hand-crafted cocktails. Fresh Pixie marmalade will be available to enjoy at breakfast
  • Agave Maria’s Restaurant & Cantina (106 S. Montgomery Ave | 805 646 6353) – A special Pixie Margarita will be served throughout Ojai Pixie Month.
  • Bliss Frozen Yogurt (451 E. Ojai Ave) – Enjoy Pixie-flavored yogurt for the month of April.
  • Farmer and the Cook (339 W El Roblar | 805 640 9608) – An all-organic cafe and grocery, Farmer and the Cook will offe Pixie Marmalade scones throughout April. Pixie-inspired desserts will also be offered at the Farm Café on Friday and Saturday nights during the month.
  • Feast Bistro (254 E. Ojai Ave | 805 640 9260) – A local favorite, Feast Bistro, will feature a wide variety of Pixie-inspired culinary offerings throughout April.
  • KNEAD Baking Co (469 E. Ojai Ave | 310 770 3282) – During Ojai Pixie Month, KNEAD will offer their famous citrus syrup cakes soaked with fresh Pixie juice. Individual sizes will be available in-store and larger ones available by advance order.
  • Marché Gourmet Deli (133 E. Ojai Ave | 805 646 1133) – This popular deli will offer Pixie Kumquat marmalade and cupcakes throughout the month of April.
  • NoSo Vita (205 N. Signal St | 805 646 1540) – NoSo Vita will offer a special dish throughout the month featuring Ojai Pixie Golden Pomodoro Sauce served over pasta with fresh mozzarella.
  • Ojai Café Emporium (108 S Montgomery St | 805 646 2723) – Throughout Ojai Pixie Month, Café Emporium will offer special Pixie Mimosas.
  • Ojai Retreat (160 Besant Rd | 805 646 2536) – The Ojai Retreat will feature additions to the traditional breakfast fare including Pixie salad, Pixie muffins, Pixie cheesecake, and a Pixie fruit salad. Breakfast is included for guests and is offered to visitors for $15.
  • Ojai Valley Inn & Spa (905 Country Club Rd. | 855 697 8780) – The resort’s culinary outlets will feature Pixie-inspired menu items and cocktails throughout the month.
  • Suzanne’s Cuisine (502 W. Ojai Ave | 805 640 1961) – Suzanne’s will feature special menu items highlighting Pixies, as well as a special Pixie Cosmopolitan.
  • The Oaks at Ojai (122 E. Ojai Ave | 805 646 5573) – The Oaks will offer Pixie popsicles for guests, as well as Pixie-infused lunch and dessert items throughout the month. The Oaks’ boutique, The Nest will carry a special dark chocolate bar infused with Pixie essence. Cooking demos throughout the month will also feature Pixies.
  • Tipple & Ramble (315 N Montgomery St | 805 319 9496) – Tipple & Ramble will offer fresh Pixie Prosecco Sangria to shoppers throughout the month of April.

LODGING PACKAGES

  • Emerald Iguana Inn and Blue Iguana Inn (805 646 5277) – Offering a special Pixie Package: gift baskets filled with Pixie Tangerines, a bottle of Casa Barranca wine, Zhena’s tea, a jar of local honey, and signature gourmet Pixie flavored chocolates. In addition, the package includes a $50 coupon to local restaurants Feast Bistro or Azu, a 25% off coupon to Ojai’s Love Heals Jewelry, and a special Iguana Pixie Seasonal Facial. The Pixie Package is available April 1 – 30, 2015.
  • Lavender Inn (210 E Matilija St | 805 646 6635) – A historic bed & breakfast, Lavendar Inn will offer Pixie muffins for guests every morning, Pixie Tangerine mimosas during Sunday brunch, and fresh Pixie Mojitos at their nightly Tapas & Wine Hour. The Inn will also host a “Farm to Fork” breakfast, including a selection of housemade Pixie dishes every Sunday during the month.
  • Ojai Valley Inn & Spa (905 Country Club Rd. | 855 697 8780) – Offering the Pixie Hotel Package, which includes accommodations in a graciously appointed guest room, a special Pixie Tangerine amenity upon arrival, a 50 minute Pixie body treatment at Spa Ojai, and a Pixie-inspired breakfast for two at The Oak (up to $60 value). The Golf Club will offer limited-edition, bright orange Pixie season golf balls. The package is available March 1 – May 31, 2015.
  • Su Nido (301 N. Montgomery St | 805 646 7080) and Casa Ojai Inn (1302 E. Ojai Ave | 805-646-8175) – Guests will enjoy a 25% discount when booking with promo code “PIXIE” and will enjoy fresh Pixies throughout their stay. Available April 1 – 30, 2015.
  • The Oaks at Ojai (122 E. Ojai Ave | 805 646 5573) – Special five-night Pixie Lodging Package includes an exclusive Pixie seasonal scrub. Also available are Pixie Pedicures, restaurant and cooking demos throughout the month featuring Pixies, and fresh Pixies for guests. Available April 1 – 30, 2015.

SHOPPING

  • deKor&Co. (105 S. Montgomery St | 805 272 8675) – deKor&Co. will offer a selection of Pixie-themed gift-boxes including a cosmetics duo of lip and nail color from FACE Stockholm and a citrus candle and bath salts along with fresh local Pixies. deKor&Co. will also partner with Olive & June for a special orange manicure pop-up featuring Ojai Sugar products and FACE Stockholm. For more information on the event please visit www.dekorandco.com.
  • Made in Ojai (323 E. Matilija St, Suite 101 | 805 646 2400) – Offering wares from Ojai resident artisans, Made in Ojai will feature Pixie
    merchandise and specifically crafted Pixie art from April 1-30, 2015.
  • Tartaglia Fine Art (307 E. Ojai Ave | 805 646 0967) – Gallery guests will enjoy fresh Pixies throughout April
  • The Oaks at Ojai (122 E. Ojai Ave | 805 646 5573) – The Oak’s boutique, The Nest, will offer discounted orange colored clothing and beauty products
  • Summer Camp (1020 W. Ojai Ave | 805 861 7109) – Limited-edition Ojai Pixie candle, handcrafted locally from the highest quality essential oils, will be available and offered at a discounted price
  • Treasures of Ojai (110 N. Signal St) – “Find the Pixie” on the price tag and receive 20% discount on that item
  • White Sparrow Boutique (305 E. Ojai Ave | 805 646 5051) – Offering discounts on all items with labeled Pixie tag

SPA

  • Lavender Inn (210 E Matilija St | 805 646 6635) – Lavender Inn will offer a 10% discount on the Orange Blossom Aromatherapy Massage during the month of April.
  • New Leaf Skin Care (321 E Ojai Ave | 805 640 9911) – New Leaf Skin Care will offer a 10% discount on all Pixie Tangerine skin and spa products, including a Pixie Organic Facial.
  • Ojai Valley Inn & Spa (905 Country Club Rd. | 855 697 8780) – Throughout April Spa Ojai offers a 20% discount on the Ojai Pixie Tangerine Body Polish Spa Treatment, as well as an Ojai Pixie Tangerine Manicure & Pedicure and a special Pixie Body Scrub available for purchase at the Spa Ojai Boutique.
  • Summer’s Dawn (439 W El Roblar | 805 746 6476) – Summer’s Dawn will offer Pixie Blossoms Spa Manicure, Ojai Pixie Custard Fresh Spa Pedicure, Ojai Dreamsicle Spa Massage, and an Ojai Pixie Facial for Pixie Month. Select retail will be 10% off. The Spa will also host a special Pixie Spa Event on April 25, 2015 where guests can indulge in mini Pixie-inspired spa treatments while sipping Pixie cocktails and enjoying small bites.
  • The Day Spa of Ojai (1434 E. Ojai Ave | 805 640 1100) – Relax and rejuvenate at The Day Spa of Ojai with a Pixie-Lavender Salt Glow Treatment, available throughout April.

 

Christina McPhee: How Ojai Inspires Me As An Artist

The audience members of the Ojai Music Festival are as eclectic, imaginative and passionate as the music performed and the artists who are engaged in the creative process. Once such patron is Christina McPhee, visual artist from the Central Coast, who shared her work with us inspired by the 2014 Festival. 

Naphthol Red - Tree of Fire

Christina McPhee, Naphthol Red – Tree of Fire, 2014, 65 x 39 x 2.5 inches. Image courtesy the artist http://christinamcphee.net

The Muslin-Drum // Ligeti Iterations :
As a child, I found sanctuary in piano practice. Each evening the required hour came with the delight of the fall of the keys, the fascination of synaesthesia’s colors with chromatic chords, and escape from external pressures. For no audience but my own brain, my ears connected with digits, and with structures of flight. Later I sought to materialize this experience in painting.

With my partner I built canvasses in translucent muslin, coated in clear, slightly crystalline rabbit skin glue, with taut surface like a drum. From the first the support and surface conditions set up a performance situation around color-shapes, linear thresholds and tensions of the stretched canvas. Interacting with these constraints set me into a graphic predictive process, to ramify lines from sound. The delicate surfaces pinged as the graphite slides across the rabbit skin. Dyes threw across the slightly glittering crystals of rabbit-skin embedded in the glue ground. The soft swish of liner brush extended murmur and glissando. Tcherepnin, Varese, Cage and Harrison crossed through this matrix. None stayed as long as Ligeti. Hundreds of repeats, listening to the cd of György Ligeti’s Piano Etudes, Books 1 and 2, as performed by Jeremy Denk in a Nonesuch recording of 2012, cast the studies into iterative material abstractions. Then I heard Denk play them live in concert at the Ojai Music Festival, in June 2014. An indelible impression, almost, a neurologic imprint…Elements of surprise, hurling passages, glissandos, rushes and stillnesses, darknesses leaching into light, shapes tumbling and subsisting in secret rhythms— these formal and performance incidents translate a code for a kinetic action through the instrument of the body onto the radiant surface.

Transliteration of painting about painting via the percussive: as the piano resonates sound by the striking of keys, so may these paintings record and store the memory of the percussive touch.

Painting as percussion…Skin-like layers articulate thresholds of shape via drawing in oil pigment, stand oil, linseed oil, spray enamel, dye and ink. The object as it’s made is in the process of depleting layers. As a conveyance for shards, or flaying skin, the surface is scar tissue. Occlusions, jams and glitch make up the scars. Scar edges refer lines, as thresholds. Shapes tumble and transgress boundaries of mapping functions. Elements refine to illuminated clarity at minute points. Ricochets touch on translucent ground. The ground remains exposed in fragments. The paintings start as oil sketch on a shop table, and finish, with glaze, on studio walls. Sometimes the work names itself early, in the first graphites; sometime late, up against the wall.

The devices of title play for and against the abstract=/-material. Drawing’s relative dialects with scoring—-allusions to landscape or possible elementals—-surrealist presences litter the paths. Ligeti’s titles refer to the sorcerer’s apprentice, the rainbow, or autumn in Warsaw. I have stolen a few. Associative logics let fly. Structural cuts ramify scores. Is performance for terrain, is the terrain for the performance? Lines of flight…

Learn more about Christine and her work >>

10 Questions with John Luther Adams

Written by M. Sean Ryan with permission from BMI.

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John Luther Adams. Photo by Kris Serafin

In writing or analyzing a piece of music, the notion of space is both multifaceted and unavoidable. For John Luther Adams, it is the root. His environmentally-minded compositions aren’t just inspired by geography and places he finds meaningful. Sometimes their performance demands musicians forgo the stage, scattering strategically instead around vast indoor and outdoor venues.

In this way, Adams has garnered a reputation for highlighting how we fit in to the world around us, musical or not. Pieces like “Inuksuit,” or, more recently, “Sila,” continue to redefine the immediate environment in which they’re performed, while his titanic opus “Become Ocean” has earned him two GRAMMY nominations as well as last year’s Pulitzer Prize in music. In addition to these prestigious honors, Columbia University’s School of the Arts recently announced that Adams will be awarded their $50,000 William Schuman Award this fall. The award recognizes “the lifetime achievement of an American composer whose works have been widely performed and generally acknowledged to be of lasting significance.”

On a recent call from New York City, the 62-year-old Adams opened up about the road that’s led him to his current standing as a world-renowned composer.

How did your relationship with BMI begin?
It would go back to the 1980s. I was a young composer thinking about affiliating with a performing rights organization, and ultimately what persuaded me — what did it was Ralph Jackson. A couple of years ago I wrote a piece on Ralph’s retirement singing his praises and talking about who he is and the difference he has made, not only in my life but in the lives of so many other composers.

In the larger musical landscape of new music, classical music, contemporary concert music — whatever you call this stuff that I’m involved with — Ralph is truly a force of nature. Now Deirdre Chadwick has taken over and like Ralph she’s an oboist. And like Ralph she’s a strong personality who cares passionately about this music. I feel really lucky to be working with her now.

In that stage of your career, when you moved to Alaska in the late ‘70s, your focus was political. Was music on the backburner?
Nothing took a backseat to anything else. I thought I could do it all: I thought I could be a full time environmental crusader; I thought I could live like Henry David Thoreau in the woods; I thought I could be a working composer, and I thought I could have a serious personal relationship and also play in the Fairbank Symphony. It took me a decade or so to realize that I had to make some choices. It was a very heady time. To be young and idealistic in Alaska in the late ‘70s and then into the early ‘80s — I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

But you’ve described that period as “lost years.” Did you mean that artistically more so than personally?
What suffered, or so I thought, was my health and also my music. I felt like I wasn’t doing as much composing as I wanted to do. I was living in the woods without running water, a mile and a half from the road. I was still working a day job. I was trying to have a family life but not living with them. It was hard on everyone, and I thought that, among other things, my music suffered. I finally quit my day job in 1989 and never looked back.

So although I didn’t compose a lot during the ‘80s, that’s when it was all coming together for me. It didn’t feel like it at the time. It was a mess, and so was I, but it was necessary in so many ways for me to go through that — not just emotionally and personally but also creatively, intellectually, artistically. I don’t really understand how that worked. All I know is that it did work — that when I thought I was wasting prime creative time, it turned out that the work was going on anyway.

Do you find that applies to your composing — that you have to step away and trust that a kind of subconscious process is still occurring?
I experience that all the time when I’m working on a specific piece, and sometimes it seems like an eternity: it might be a week; it might be a month; it might be a year or two that I’m struggling with something. And I know now just to trust that and go with it.

But I was younger, and this was a whole damn decade! [laughs] — That’s a long gestation period. I like to say that I made all the wrong choices: I didn’t go to graduate school; I didn’t win the right prizes; I didn’t study with the right people; I didn’t pursue a career…and of course over the long run they turned out to be all of the right choices.

When you were making those decisions, would you say it was a conscious effort on your part to avoid the conventional route whenever you saw two options?
I think it was this mixture of kind of purposeful defiance, but also, you know — you’re made a certain way. You have a certain temperament or constitution, and you’re obsessed with a certain vision of how your life is supposed to be and how your art is supposed to be, and you just can’t do anything else. I say I made all the wrong choices. Really, I didn’t have a choice.

What advice would you give to composers in a similar point in their artistic career?
Don’t do what I did! Make your own mistakes. Find your own private Alaska, and do that — whatever it may be, wherever it may be. You’ve got to follow that passion, that thing that you feel most deeply drawn to do.

Again, this idea of ‘the lost decade’: I’m realizing even as I’m talking, not only was it unconventional; it was difficult. To be carrying water and chopping wood, and living in an extreme climate, and trying to maintain multiple lives at once. And I didn’t realize how difficult it was until after the fact. But I think that’s why it took longer for things to come together for me, creatively, personally and professionally, because my path was a little more—[laughs] off-road.

Were there other “Alaskas” for you before? Either a place or moment that inspired you or opened you up in some new way?
There were little epiphanies like that along the way. The Beatles on Ed Sullivan in 1964. Frank Zappa introducing us to Edgard Varèse in the late ‘60s. There was my buddy Dennis Keeley, the photographer, telling me that, no, I wasn’t going to Columbia; I was going to this brand new, experimental school in Southern California, the California Institute of the Arts, and thank God I listened to him. There was reading Walden at the age of 15, having my whole view of life and the world and our place in the world challenged.

But the defining moment was when I first set foot on the ground in Alaska. It was the place itself, the wilderness and these vast seemingly untouched landscapes beyond which I couldn’t imagine. But it was also my community, or dare I say, my family: first and foremost my wife, Cynthia, who has been my soul mate and my life companion for 37-going-on 38 years now; then my two dearest friends, Gordon Wright, the conductor of the Fairbanks Symphony and the Arctic Chamber Orchestra, who was my next-door neighbor and my camping buddy; and also John Haines, Alaska’s great poet, who homesteaded up there in the late ‘40s and lived the life you and I can only imagine, and wrote poetry like no one else.

I just can’t imagine where I would be without them. Both Gordon and John are gone now. But the four of us shared a certain experience of the North: not just as a big pristine landscape but also as a place to begin again, and maybe demonstrate a different relationship between the human animal and the places we lived, to imagine a new culture if that doesn’t sound too grandiose.

A review of “Sila” describes an exchange in which you say you’re still learning the score to that piece. Can you explain what you meant?
I was in that moment where the notes were all on the page but I didn’t know whether it was going to work, or how, because “Sila,” like many of my works, is a pretty experimental piece. And although everything is written down, you don’t necessarily know what’s going to be happening at any given moment. You can say, generally, how things flow. It’s kind of an adrenaline or endorphin high to be on that edge.

It was such a big piece, in such a high profile venue, and I was right down to the wire with it. Being outside is even more problematic. We didn’t actually get to hear the piece before the day of the premiere — we had one indoor rehearsal and it was necessary and useful, but it was painful because you can’t really hear a piece like that indoors; it’s too big for even the largest indoor space. So I didn’t know until two or three hours before the first performance that we actually had a piece. That was kind of terrifying, but right where I want to be.

You’re also involved in education. How does that complement your creativity when composing?
Teaching has been an occasional thing for me. I do a lot of short-term residencies where I’ll go in for a few days or a week or two, give lectures, coach performances and critique work of student composers. And I really love that. There are a number of young composers and performing musicians that I’ve known as students who are out there in the world doing wonderful things. And that’s so gratifying, to watch them go out and make their marks in the art. I think if you’re a good teacher, you learn more than you teach.

I’ve decided it’s an important part of my calling, but it’s not a central part of my calling. I feel music is worthy of a lifetime of devotion, because music always knows more than I do. Music is always ahead of me, and my job is to follow it. It’s a process of trying to ask the right questions and not be too attached to the answers. I find that if I ask the right questions and keep refining the questions, making them more specific, and more and more clear, that the answers take care of themselves. People sometimes ask me, ‘What’s your favorite piece that you’ve done?’ And my answer is: the one I’m working on now, or the one I haven’t written yet, because there’s just such a thrill in the asking of the questions, the following of the flow of the music and the process of the discovery.

What are you working on now for 2015?
I’ve just released another disc on Cold Blue, the little label in Los Angeles that I’ve worked with for years. It’s called The Wind in High Places, and it features the JACK Quartet and also an orchestra of 48 cellos, which is an amazing sound.

And I’m in the process of writing a book, which will be a memoir of life and work, almost forty years in Alaska. I want to do another concert-length orchestral work to complete the set: there is “Become River,” there is “Become Ocean,” and I want to compose “Become Desert.” I imagine that piece as a large orchestra scattered all around the space and a complete concert unto itself.

Then “Sila” is just beginning its life. We’re actually going to do several performances in several different locations in Washington, D.C. We’re talking about doing a brass-woodwinds-percussion version of the piece on the steps between the Lincoln Memorial and Reflecting Pond. The 80-plus version will, I hope, be in the National Building Museum…this cavernous space. These performances will be in conjunction with the U.S. Air Force Band. The west coast premiere will be the Ojai festival in California in June, and it’ll be followed by a performance in Berkeley. Then next fall we will open up the new music building at Northwestern University — we’re going to consecrate the house. And we’re going to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Balboa Park in San Diego with another performance of “Sila.” So that piece is going to have a busy year!

View The 69th Festival Schedule For June 10-14, 2015

7.11.13Percussionists are different. Their musical world has no fixed boundaries; there is no limit to the instruments they play and the sounds they make. There are no pretentious barriers between nature and artifice, no strictures on performing indoors or out. Their precursors reach back to the dawn of time and members of their guild are found in every culture. Hand a percussionist a random rock or the most exquisitely forged gong and he or she will make it speak, sometimes with breathtaking virtuosity born of the simplest gestures by which we interact, though touch, with our material world. So what does it mean that Ojai’s 2015 music director is a percussionist? Quite a lot if that percussionist is Steven Schick.

No one has done more to champion, interpret, and expand the repertory of contemporary percussion music than Steven Schick. Not only has he mastered the entire solo repertory – and more than doubled its size through commissions – but as a conductor, educator, and author he has deepened our understanding of the role of percussion in music’s past, present, and future. More importantly, as an artist of broad interests and deep convictions he has explored cultural issues well beyond the already boundless frontiers of his chosen specialization.

To a percussionist’s ear music begins with rhythm, color, and gesture and these are the elements that form the nexus of the diverse works and decidedly international array of composers of this all 20th– and 21st-century festival. Naturally, we’ll hear Steven Schick perform classics of the solo percussion repertory – compositions by Stockhausen, Xenakis, and Globokar, as well as more recent compositions by David Lang and Kaija Saariaho, and the American premiere of Roland Auzet’s staging of Kurt Schwitter’s Dadist masterpiece, Ursonate. But Steve will also conduct ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble), red fish blue fish, Renga, and musicians from CalArts, groups with which he is closely identified, in a broad array of ensemble works of varied scorings, including the West Coast premiere of John Luther Adams’ Sila. Among the distinguished soloists is cellist Maya Beiser playing pieces by Osvaldo Golijov, Michael Harrison, and Chinary Ung.

Other highlights are a sunrise performance of Morton Feldman’s For Philip Guston in which Steve is joined by flutist Claire Chase and pianist Sarah Rothenberg, Lou Harrison’s Concerto for Pipa featuring Wu Man, and Messiaen’s Vision de l’amen with pianists Gloria Cheng and Vicki Ray. This year’s “old timers” include Copland, Chavez, Ginastera, and Varèse, all with scores new to Ojai, save one late-night chestnut: Appalachian Spring.

2015 marks the beginning of a three-year celebration of Ojai’s roots in Southern California, where open exploration and cross-cultural dialogue are written into the DNA. It is therefore especially apt that this festival opens with a Wednesday night multimedia tribute to Pierre Boulez, seven-time festival director, on the occasion of his 90th birthday. Four concerts are devoted to his music, each in creative juxtaposition with works by Béla Bartók: the six string quartets and, as the finale, the Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion. This means Steven Schick will have the last word: a snare drum diminuendo with which he ushers us across the fluid borders of his imagination into silence.

– Christopher Hailey

Christopher Hailey is a music historian specializing in new music. He is the Ojai Music Festival’s longtime annotator and host of Concert Insights, the Festival’s in-depth discussions held before each concert.

Listen and view Steven Schick’s playlist >>

View the complete 2015 Schedule >>

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Ojai Music Festival Receives New Music USA Project Grants Award

Download PDF version of the press release >>

(Ojai CA) — The Ojai Music Festival has received a project grants award from New Music USA in support of the 69th Festival, June 10 to 14, 2015, led by Music Director Steven Schick. Together with Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris, Mr. Schick has curated an explosive and immensely playful program celebrating music from the 20th and 21st centuries and the music and influences of Pierre Boulez on the occasion of his 90th birthday in the spring.

“New Music USA’s generous support helps to ensure the Ojai Music Festival’s commitment to innovative and adventurous programming and our vision to reach wider audiences,” said Executive Director Janneke Straub. “It affirms our collective vision of expanding new music landscapes.“

The 2015 Festival welcomes Ojai alumni artist, percussionist, conductor, teacher, and author Steven Schick as music director. He will be joined by artistic colleagues making their Ojai debuts, including ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble), flutist Claire Chase, pipa artist Wu Man, cellist Maya Beiser, the Calder Quartet, and San Diego-based string ensemble Renga. Returning to Ojai will be pianists Gloria Cheng and Vicki Ray, mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell, and percussion ensemble red fish blue fish.

Awards for New Music USA’s third round of project grants total $284,250 support artistic work involving a wide range of new American music. The program recognizes and supports the multiple roles composers and contemporary music practitioners play in the artistic landscape and responds to the creative spirit of collaboration between artists from multiple disciplines. The 62 awarded projects include concerts and recordings as well as dance, film, theater, opera, and more, all involving contemporary music as an essential element.

In response to feedback from artists who were surveyed last summer following the two inaugural rounds of the program, the third round grants included a special focus on requests of $3,000 and below. Approximately 65% of grants awarded were in this category. The next round of project grants will open for requests in March 2015, and decisions will be announced in June 2015.

Including the awards announced today, New Music USA’s project grants program, launched in October 2013, has now distributed $932,250 in support of 179 projects. Seventy-four of the project grants awardees are first-time recipients of grants from New Music USA and its legacy organizations Meet The Composer and the American Music Center. Awarded projects from all three rounds can be discovered, explored and followed by the public via their media rich project pages at https://www.newmusicusa.org/all-projects. The public-facing gallery of projects and the ability for artists to update their progress and interact with followers is an important promotional tool that extends the program’s service to artists beyond financial support. The overarching goal of project grants is to reach and aggregate the communities of new music enthusiasts, irrespective of genre preferences, and allow the public to discover new artistic work.

Ed Harsh, president and CEO, comments: “We want to give artists money, but we want to give artists more than money. We want to give them a way to spread the experience of their work to a wide world of people eager to engage with it.”

ABOUT THE OJAI MUSIC FESTIVAL
From its founding in 1947, the Ojai Music Festival has created a place for groundbreaking musical experiences, bringing together innovative artists and curious audiences in an intimate, idyllic setting 80 miles northwest of Los Angeles. The Festival presents broad-ranging programs in unusual ways with an eclectic mix of rarely performed music, refreshing juxtapositions of musical styles, and music by today’s composers. The four-day festival is a complete immersive experience with concerts, free community events, symposia, film screenings, and social gatherings. Considered a highlight of the summer season, Ojai has remained a leader in the classical music landscape.

The Ojai Music Festival attracts the world’s greatest musical artists. Through its unique structure of the Artistic Director appointing an annual music director, Ojai has presented a “who’s who” of music including: Aaron Copland, Igor Stravinsky, Olivier Messiaen, Michael Tilson Thomas, Kent Nagano, Pierre Boulez, John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Spano, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, David Robertson, eighth blackbird, George Benjamin, Dawn Upshaw, Leif Ove Andsnes, Mark Morris, and Jeremy Denk. For more information on the Ojai Music Festival and the 69th season, visit OjaiFestival.org (http://www.OjaiFestival.org).

NEW MUSIC USA
New Music USA (https://www.newmusicusa.org/) formed in November 2011 from the merger of the American Music Center and Meet The Composer with a mandate to increase the audience for new American music. New Music USA’s endowments include an $11.25 million corpus for grant making supplemented by support from a number of generous annual funders. The approach to consolidating five of the legacy organizations’ grant making programs was driven by two core convictions. First, that the best way to serve new music is to ask practitioners what they need rather than tell them what they should want. Second, that the process for requesting financial support should be simple and should help artists and audiences connect.  New Music USA is devoted to fostering the creation, dissemination, and enjoyment of new American music. New Music USA places special emphasis on broadening the public community for the music and musicians whom we serve.

Advocacy in the broadest sense is at the heart of all of New Music USA’s work. It is inherent in the work of the online magazine NewMusicBox (http://www.newmusicbox.org/) and radio station Counterstream (https://www.newmusicusa.org/counterstream-radio/), in all of New Music USA’s grant making activity—which distributes more than one million dollars each year to the field—and in New Music USA’s role as a key voice in the national and international scenes.

ROUND THREE AWARDED PROJECTS
Paradigm Lost • 2015 Ojai Music Festival • New Works for the OpenICE Initiative • American notes – Engaging new Communities • The Snow Falls in the Winter • Featured Composer Residency with Derek Bermel • Edmar Castaneda Performance and “Meet the Artist” Event* • Inquisitive – A New Work for Cantus and High School Choir • Iron Shoes • Written in Water • Black Mountain Songs • Capriccio • Interaction of Color • STEVE COLEMAN: SYNOVIAL JOINTS RECORDING PROJECT* • The Brain Piece • 95 RITUALS (for Anna Halprin) • The Black Rose • PATIENT(CE)* • TRIBE* • A Piano Party for Terry Riley at 80 • Wild Rumps: In Time • American Composers Orchestra Premiers Motormouth for Chamber Orchestra at Carnegie Hall • A Debut CD: The Music of Eric Nathan • Recording “Letting Time Circle Through” • Brass Band Blastoff • Choreographing LeWitt* • Walk to the Beat* • Talujon’s Pocket Gamelan • Man Forever with TIGUE – Percussion and Vocal Canons* • Sympathetic Magic* • Synth Nights: Morton Subotnick • SOUNDIAL* • Alternative Guitar Summit • Water, Water, Everywhere • Intimate Instruments Workshop: Building the Linguaphone of Tremulous Communion • 2015 New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival • Duo Damiana Debut Recording: Adventurous Repertoire for Flute and Guitar* • CAUGHT IN THE TREETOPS* • Along These Lines • Contemporaneous Presents Self-Portrait, a Fifth Anniversary Celebration* • Radiant Child Voice Recording • Face Resection* • RighteousGIRLS* • Luminous Etudes: Visions of the Black Madonna of Montserrat • Record original jazz/classical works for piano* • Sowah Mensah Commission* • SOLI: Experience • Kettle Corn New Music 2014-15: Sandbox Percussion and Lisa Moore* • Commercial Recording Featuring Solo Piano Works by Timo Andres and Phil Young • Old Text Woven New* • Lisa Renee Coons in Residence at 2015 Women Composers Festival in Hartford • Meehan/Perkins Duo Records New American Percussion Works • 3 Singers* • TRAFFIC JAM* • Babbling • flux-mirror for saxophone and electronics* • A New work for Flute and Electronics written for Flutist Carla Rees* • Matana Roberts: COIN COIN • Tonecycle for Blues (2014) Base 30 Hz, 2:3:7 Vocal Version with 3:4 and 6:7.

*indicates first time awardee

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Apply To Be A 2015 Festival Intern

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Just as the Festival nurtures emerging artistic talent on the stage and cultivates interest in music in Ojai Valley public schools, it is also committed to training the next generation of music and arts management students through its internship program.

Each year, the Ojai Music Festival Arts Management Internship Program welcomes 12-14 college students and recent graduates to go behind the scenes of a renowned summer music festival. Interns work closely with the staff and production team, providing critical support and gaining invaluable hands-on experience and skills for their future careers. Each intern receives during their 2-3 week internship:

  • An immersive experience in the world of a festival and inside knowledge into the many different pieces that come together for a successful weekend of concerts
  • Training for their areas of responsibility from staff and leaders in the field
  • Free and discounted tickets to Festival concerts (depending on work schedule and availability)
  • Housing and/or homestay in the beautiful Ojai Valley and most meals during the Festival
  • Stipend

The Festival invites interested students from all fields of study to apply for an internship. The program is ideally suited for curious, motivated individuals who are interested in the diversity of possible careers in the arts, events, and the nonprofit world. Festival interns have gone on to have successful careers in both the nonprofit and for-profit sectors – those who have gone on to work in the arts have done so at organizations across the country, including Pacific Symphony, Early Music Guild of Seattle, and Voices of Change, as well as forged new paths as entrepreneurial performing artists and composers.

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Q & A With Festival Producer Elaine Martone

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Elaine Martone with Michael Bishop at the 2010 Grammy Award Show, winning for Best Surround Sound Album for “Transmigration.”

Congratulations to Festival Producer Elaine Martone for her Grammy nomination for Producer of the Year in the classical music category!

Elaine was brought on as the Festival producer in 2012. Prior to joining us, she was executive vice president of production at Telarc Records for 29 years. As a key executive in planning and creative decision-making, she managed more than 1,500 projects and was accountable for more than $6 million annually in production costs. A world-class producer, she is a five-time Grammy Award winner in both Classical and Jazz.

Born in Rochester, New York, Elaine moved to Cleveland to study oboe with aspirations of playing with a symphony orchestra. A graduate of Ithaca College with a Bachelor of Music degree, she was taught the basics of the industry by Telarc founders Robert Woods and Jack Renner, quickly grasping what determined the famed Telarc sound and becoming an accomplished editor and an integral part of the management team. Elaine has served as producer on more than 200 recordings, both classical and jazz, including those by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra with Robert Spano and Robert Shaw, The Cleveland Orchestra with Franz Welser-Möst, the Philharmonia Orchestra with Ben Zander and jazz greats Ray Brown, Dave Brubeck, Oscar Peterson, Tierney Sutton, and McCoy Tyner to name a few.

Elaine was executive director of Spring for Music produced at Carnegie Hall with founding directors Thomas W. Morris, David V. Foster and Mary Lou Falcone, music industry legends.

With her husband, Robert Woods, she has formed a music enterprise, Sonarc Music, and is pursuing her passion, producing great music and musicians, as well as working with talented young people. She was a founding board member of Red {An Orchestra}, which completed seven seasons in Cleveland, Ohio.


Elaine in Studio

Literally, a behind the scene photo of the recording of the Vaughan Williams CD with Elaine Martone.

How did you become interested in sound recording?
It wasn’t sound recording I was interested in but more it was musical performance and what made a performance great. So I started at Telarc out of college (Ithaca College) with a degree in oboe performance. I was hired to do production at then fledging Telarc Records; I first did quality control of metal parts used to make vinyl records (back in the day) and then progressed to learning how to edit on the first digital music editing systems. Those experiences helped me understand Telarc’s philosophy of how a recording should sound. I went on from there to assistant producer and finally as producer in the hot seat!

 

What is the most fulfilling part of your job as a CD producer, and as the Festival producer?
I love when I can make a contribution to the world and music is my way of doing that. I love our funny, weird, lovely world of artists and creating stuff!

Elaine and Spano

Elaine and Conductor Robert Spano enjoying some “down time” during a recording session.

What is the most unusual recordings that you have been involved with in your career?
Most unusual – PDQ Bach recording: Classical Talkity Talk Radio when we were recording the Pachelbel Canon and we needed a bass drum. We looked up in the ceiling of the Harm’s Theatre we were recording in in New Jersey, and up there was a beaten up bass drum. We had a snare drum beater but no bass drum beater. Someone had brought a bushel of apples— we stuck an apple on the snare drum stick and that was the bass drum beater.

What is one of your most favorite CD recordings of all time?
Rachmaninoff Vespers with Robert Shaw and Robert Shaw Festival Singers recorded in The Quercy region of France in July 1989…. It was magical.

What do you like to do in your spare time?
In my spare time I take ballroom dance lessons and sometimes do competitive ballroom dancing. I just started learning Argentine tango, and ballet. I love gardening, reading, and hanging out with my family and friends.

 

 

 

“In The Ojai Spirit” by Christopher Hailey

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For nearly 70 years, the Ojai Music Festival has been a laboratory for the special chemistry that results from combining insatiable curiosity with unbounded creativity. The formula is simple: Each year a music director is given the freedom and resources to imagine four days of musical brainstorming. Some have approached their task with caution, fearing that Ojai might be like other places. But, of course, it’s not. More often this unique blend of enchanted setting and an audience voracious in its appetite for challenge and discovery has inspired a distinguished series of conductors, performers, composers to push at boundaries and stretch limits.

At its inception in 1947, under the guidance of Festival founder John Bauer and conductor Thor Johnson, the Festival featured a balance of classics and more contemporary fare. By the time Lawrence Morton took over as Artistic Director in 1954 the emphasis had shifted to new music and Ojai soon became the showcase as well as a home-away-from-home for such 20th century giants as Luciano Berio, Pierre Boulez, Elliott Carter, Aaron Copland, Lou Harrison, and Olivier Messiaen, not to mention two Southern California “locals”: Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky. It was Morton who established the tradition of rotating Music Directors and with this innovation each year’s Festival became the reflection of a succession of larger-than-life personalities, including Robert Craft (joined in 1955 and 1956 by Stravinsky), Copland, Ingolf Dahl, the late Lukas Foss, Boulez, Peter Maxwell-Davies, as well as such rising stars as Michael Tilson Thomas, Calvin Simmons, Kent Nagano, John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, and David Robertson. Through the years Ojai’s Music Directors have invited distinguished soloists, first-rate chamber ensembles, and world-class orchestras to join them in exploring the intersection between new music and everything from jazz and improvisation to electronics and computers; dance, theater, and experimental staging to social and political issues, not to mention repertory that might go back to the Middle Ages or reach across the globe.

Looking back, it would be difficult to identify any overarching aesthetic premise, though from year to year there has been no shortage of agendas. Rather, the thread running through these past decades has been this Festival’s consistency in promoting creativity and innovation. Here in Ojai hallowed masterpieces and in-your-face experiments can be uneasy bedfellows sharing a berth that is a pedestal of repose for one, a trampoline for the other. And that rumble you hear? It is the steady grumbling from an audience whose outspoken views on any and every subject are the entitlement of its loyalty. Its passion is the true barometer of the health of this Festival. No smugness here; no indifference, either. This is a place for enthusiasms, often excessive, and opinions, sometimes vociferous, and a hunger for shared discovery that reaffirms, year after year, why music matters in the first place.

Christopher Hailey

Festival Music Directors >>
Festival Milestones >>
Festival Fact Sheet >>

 

Make A Gift And Support Groundbreaking Musical Experiences

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When you make a gift to the Ojai Music Festival, you help to create a place for groundbreaking musical experiences where artists are encouraged to take risks; where audiences feel deeply connected to the music and to each other; and where the community is welcomed with free performances and year-round education programs – all in the beautiful setting of the Ojai Valley.

We invite you to invest in the Festival’s creative process by becoming a member, bringing projects to life through our special funds, or simply making a donation.

Thank you for supporting the Ojai Music Festival!

Thank You For Attending The 2015 Launch Party

Launch Party

Thank you to everyone who joined us at our 2015 Launch Party on November 22. We had a wonderful time meeting Festival enthusiasts from Ojai, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles…and beyond!

Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris went through the schedule for 2015, highlighting artists and overarching programmatic themes that emerged over the course of planning the Festival with Music Director Steven Schick. As Tom said, “You can look at the Festival flow in this way: Day 1 – a sonic spectacular; Day 2 – introducing Steven Schick, percussionist; Day 3 – introducing all the artists; Day 4 – mixing everyone up. And cutting across everything is the celebration of Pierre Boulez.”

We also showed clips from the world premiere of A Pierre Dream: A Portrait of Pierre Boulez, which will be presented on June 10, and of John Luther Adams discussing Sila: The Breath of the World, which will be performed on June 11. If you were unable to attend, you can view both clips below.

See the full 2015 Festival schedule >>

 

Sign Up Today For OjaiU 2015 – Launching In The Spring

OjaiUlogo1080x87OjaiU 2015 will be a “history of the world according to percussion”, as told by Steven Schick. Rather than simply a history of percussion or a series of demonstrations, the three-session class will explore the history and relationship between percussion and culture, and the wider world around us. Using demonstrations from Steven, clips from percussive sounds found in everyday life, and more, OjaiU 2015 will explore fundamental questions of how our notions of sound, rhythm, and music are related to the culture around it and how these things reflect and influence the world around us.

OjaiU is a series of free courses designed to help audiences “listen smarter” and enable them to gain deeper insight into music. Far from being simply “program notes,” OjaiU is built around the ideas that animate the thinking behind a Festival like Ojai, featuring observations by artists, critics, and experts.

OjaiU starts in spring 2015, sign up below!
Read about and revisit OjaiU 2013 >>

 

 

 

Thank You For A Successful Holiday Home Look In & Marketplace!

Thank you to all the attendees, homeowners, designers, volunteers, and vendors for helping to make this year’s Holiday Home Look In and Marketplace a success! With perfect weather, beautiful homes, and the tireless cheer of the Women’s Committee, we couldn’t have asked for a better weekend. We hope to see you again next year!

We’re still getting together photos, but check out a few we managed to grab in between shuttles…

 

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This Weekend: Tickets Available For The Holiday Home Look In

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Explore beautiful Ojai Valley homes spruced up with festive inspirations for you to enjoy!Saturday & Sunday, November 15 and 16  |  10am to 4pm

$30/per person (advance price) | Prices increase to $35 during tour weekend
Buy tickets or pick up tickets:
  • Our will call box office will be at the Holiday Marketplace, located at the Matilija Junior High School Gym (703 El Paseo Road)
  • Need tickets? You can purchase at the Holiday Marketplace, or at one of our ticket outlets – Attitude Adjustment, Down Home Furnishings, Kava Gifts, or Rains Department Store. Prices increase to $35 per person. Download a $5 off coupon here >> 
  • Call our box office at 805 646 2094. Tickets over the phone will be placed in our will call box office

Plan your weekend:

  • Stop by the Holiday Marketplace (703 El Paseo Road) and enjoy more than 40 curated vendors! Admission is free and open to the public. For more information click here >>
  • Weather reports are predicting beautiful clear skies for the weekend.
  • Homes will be given decorative holiday sprucing provided by Ojai Valley designers.
  • Wear comfortable, closed-toe shoes. The homes also have beautiful outdoor grounds to stroll
  • Children under 12 will not be admitted in the homes
  • There will be complimentary shuttles to take you to Las Piedras, and it will be worth the trip to see this amazing property! Catch the shuttle at San Antonio School (650 Carne Road)
  • Take the time to enjoy a great meal at one of Ojai’s restaurants. There are many to choose from – Osteria Monte Grappa to Suzanne’s Cuisine, to Marche Gourmet and Feast Bistro. View a list of eateries here >>
    For more information please call us at 805 646 2094

2015 Music Director Steven Schick Announces Programs For The 69th Festival: June 10-14, 2015

The 2015 Festival is a celebration of 20th and 21st century composers with works by seventeen new to Ojai including Alberto Ginastera, Michael Gordon, Julia Wolfe, David Lang, Pauline Oliveros, as well as by emerging composers including Anna Thorvaldsdottir and Lei Liang

The Festival marks the occasion of Pierre Boulez’s 90th birthday with a special event, A Pierre Dream: A Portrait of Pierre Boulez, the West Coast premiere of the Chicago Symphony’s Beyond the Score production on Wednesday, June 10, plus five concerts pairing the music of Boulez with works by Bartók, Messiaen, and Ravel

Program features the West Coast premiere of Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams’ Sila: The Breath of the World and the American premiere of Roland Auzet’s staging of Kurt Schwitters’ Dadaist masterpiece Ursonate

Cal Performances’ Ojai at Berkeley slated for June 18-20 after the Ojai Music Festival

“As a percussionist I spend my days searching for new sounds and new places to experience them. I often think of myself as a pilgrim in the land of new noises. For me, then, the Ojai Festival is paradise: it’s the perfect combination of provocative new sounds, great music and a magical place.”  – Steven Schick, Music Director

Download PDF version of the press release >>

OJAI, CA (November 13, 2014) — The 69th Ojai Music Festival (June 10-14, 2015) with Music Director Steven Schick focuses on 20th and 21st century composers. With Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris, Mr. Schick has curated an explosive festival featuring music by more than 30 composers, half of whom are new to Ojai. Highlights also include the West Coast premiere of John Luther Adams’ Sila: The Breath of the World and the celebration of Pierre Boulez’s 90th birthday with a special event on Wednesday, June 10, and throughout the Festival, with five concerts devoted to his music and musical influences.

The 2015 Festival welcomes Ojai alumni artist, percussionist, conductor, teacher, and author Steven Schick as music director. He will be joined by artistic colleagues making their Ojai debuts, including ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble), flutist Claire Chase, pipa artist Wu Man, cellist Maya Beiser, the Calder Quartet, and San Diego-based string ensemble Renga. Returning to Ojai will be pianists Gloria Cheng and Vicki Ray, mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell, and percussion ensemble red fish blue fish.

No one has done more to champion, interpret, and expand the repertoire of contemporary percussion music than Steven Schick. Not only has he mastered the entire solo repertory – and more than doubled its size through commissions – but as a conductor, educator, and author he has deepened the understanding of the role of percussion in music’s past, present, and future. More importantly, as an artist of broad interests and deep convictions, he has explored cultural issues well beyond the already boundless frontiers of his chosen specialization.

To a percussionist’s ear music begins with rhythm, color, and gesture and these are the elements that form the nexus of the diverse works and decidedly international array of composers of this all 20th- and 21st-century festival. Mr. Schick will perform classics of the solo percussion repertory — compositions by Karl Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis, and Vinko Globokar — as well as more recent works by David Lang and Kaija Saariaho. Mr. Schick will tackle Globokar’s theatrical works Toucher, in which he is called on to recite Brecht while confronting an array of percussion sounds, and ?Corporel, where he performs body percussion bare-chested and barefoot. He will also perform the American premiere of Roland Auzet’s staging of Kurt Schwitters’ Dadaist masterpiece, Ursonate.

Mr. Schick will also conduct ICE, red fish blue fish, and Renga – groups with which he is closely identified – in a broad array of ensemble works of varied scorings.

Five Festival concerts are devoted to Pierre Boulez’s music and musical influences, four in juxtaposition with works by Béla Bartók — the six string quartets performed by the Calder Quartet, and as the Festival finale, the Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion with pianists Gloria Cheng and Vicki Ray and percussionists Steven Schick and Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Joseph Pereira. Another concert will pair Boulez’s works with the music of Maurice Ravel and Olivier Messiaen.

Among the distinguished soloists joining Mr. Schick are cellist Maya Beiser playing pieces by Osvaldo Golijov, Michael Harrison, Bright Sheng, and Chinary Ung; virtuoso pipa player Wu Man performing Lou Harrison’s Concerto for Pipa; and mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell singing Ravel’s Trois poèmes de Stéphane Mallarmé. Other highlights are a sunrise performance of Morton Feldman’s hypnotic 4-1/2 hour marathon, For Philip Guston, in which Mr. Schick will be joined by flutist Claire Chase and pianist Sarah Rothenberg, and Ms. Cheng and Ms. Ray performing Messiaen’s mystical work Visions de l’amen. This year’s program will also include works by Alberto Ginastera, whose music is new to Ojai, Carlos Chavez and Edgard Varèse, as well as one late-night chestnut, Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring, in the composer’s arrangement for 13 players.

A Pierre Dream: A Portrait of Pierre Boulez
The Ojai Music Festival honors Pierre Boulez on the occasion of his 90th birthday with four concerts featuring Boulez’s music paired with the music of Béla Bartók. In addition, on Wednesday, June 10, Ojai will present the West Coast premiere of A Pierre Dream: A Portrait of Pierre Boulez, a kaleidoscope of recorded and live music, words, and imagery of Maestro Boulez. A Pierre Dream is one of Chicago Symphony’s Beyond the Score programs and features an original set design by celebrated architect Frank Gehry. The performance will be preceded by a special panel discussion with Boulez’s friends and colleagues entitled “Boulez in Ojai.” Pierre Boulez has served as music director seven times since he first curated the Festival in 1967. He was most recently music director in 2003.

The Ojai performance of A Pierre Dream will be performed by ICE and mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell, conducted by Steven Schick. It will include projections of rare documentary footage of Pierre Boulez from the 1960s to the present day. At the core of the projected material will be footage from very recent 2013 interviews with Boulez conducted in his home in Baden-Baden, Germany, specially made for this project, the development of which he has supported from the beginning.

“Pierre Boulez is not only one of the seminal figures of our time but a prominent figure in Ojai’s history having made Ojai debut in 1967. He has been music director seven times. It is only fitting that we celebrate this master and friend on this milestone,” commented Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris.

Sila: The Breath of the World
Festival collaborator and recent Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams returns to Ojai with the West Coast premiere of Sila: The Breath of the World, to be performed at a free community event throughout Libbey Park. This new work for an ensemble of 80 musicians received its first performances last July at the Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival. In the Inuit tradition, sila is the spirit that animates all things – the wind, the weather, and all forces of nature. In Sila: The Breath of the World, composed specifically to be heard outdoors, musicians and listeners alike are encouraged to move about the performance space freely. The Ojai performance will include musicians from CalArts, ICE, and red fish blue fish. Mr. Adams’ music was first heard at the 2009 Festival, and again in 2012 with a performance of Inuksuit in Libbey Park. The 2013 Festival featured performances of his For Lou Harrison, Strange and Sacred Noise, and songbirdsongs.

Community Concerts
The Festival’s tradition of free community concerts and Ojai Late Nights for Festival attendees and the public continues. 2015 highlights include a work by percussionist/composer Glenn Kotche making his Ojai debut; Evan Ziporyn’s arrangements of rock music by Led Zepplin, Pink Floyd, Jimi Hendrix, and others; and music by emerging composers of the ICElab program. Ojai Films will be announced in the spring.

Ojai Talks
Ojai Talks with host Ara Guzelimian, former Festival Artistic Director and Dean of The Juilliard School, begin on Thursday, June 11, with Mr. Guzelimian in conversation with John Luther Adams and Steven Schick. This discussion is followed by a second session, “The World of Percussion” with Mr. Schick. On Friday, June 12, Mr. Guzelimian will lead conversations with Festival artists Claire Chase and Wu Man.

Ojai North is now Ojai at Berkeley
Marking the fifth year of artistic partnership, Ojai at Berkeley celebrates the dynamic nature of the Ojai Music Festival and of Cal Performances. As two distinct communities with similar values, Ojai and Berkeley are known for intrepid artistic discovery, spirited intellect, and enduring engagement in the arts. Inaugurated in 2011, Ojai at Berkeley follows the 2015 Ojai Music Festival, taking place from June 18 to 20 in Berkeley, CA. Ojai at Berkeley creates a joint force that enables co-commissions and co-productions and allows artists to achieve more than could be imagined by each organization separately. 2015 Ojai at Berkeley will announce its program schedule on November 18. For more information visit CalPerformances.org.

Steven Schick, Music Director
No stranger to Ojai, percussionist, conductor, and author Steven Schick collaborated on the 2011 Festival’s production of George Crumb’s Winds of Destiny (Dawn Upshaw, music director), as well as the 2012 Festival (Leif Ove Andsnes, music director) in John Luther Adams’ Inuksuit. Mr. Schick was born in Iowa and raised in a farming family. For 35 years he has championed contemporary music by commissioning and premiering more than 150 new works. He was the founding percussionist of the Bang on a Can All-Stars (1992-2002) and served as Artistic Director of the Centre International de Percussion de Genève (2000-2005). Mr. Schick is founder and Artistic Director of the percussion group, red fish blue fish. Currently, he is Music Director of the La Jolla Symphony and Chorus and Artistic Director of the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players. In 2012 he became the first Artist-in-Residence with the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE). He also maintains a lively schedule of guest conducting including appearances with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Mr. Schick founded and is currently Artistic Director of “Roots and Rhizomes,” a summer course on contemporary percussion music held at the Banff Centre for the Arts. Among his acclaimed publications is a book, The Percussionist’s Art: Same Bed, Different Dreams, and numerous recordings of contemporary percussion music including a three CD set of the complete percussion music of Iannis Xenakis (Mode). Steven Schick is Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego.

For more artist bios, visit OjaiFestival.org

Thomas W. Morris, Artistic Director
Thomas W. Morris was appointed artistic director of the Ojai Music Festival starting with the 2004 Festival and will provide artistic direction through the 75th Festival in 2021. Mr. Morris is recognized as one of the most innovative leaders in the orchestra industry and served as the long-time chief executive of both The Cleveland Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Morris is currently active nationally and internationally as a consultant, lecturer, teacher, and writer.

As artistic director of the 69-year-old Festival, Mr. Morris is responsible for artistic planning, and each year appoints a music director with whom he collaborates on shaping the Festival’s programming. During his decade-long tenure, audiences have increased and the scope of the Festival has expanded, most recently to include a collaborative partnership, Ojai at Berkeley, with Cal Performances in Berkeley.

Mr. Morris was a founding director of Spring for Music, and served as the project’s artistic director. He currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Curtis Institute of Music and as chair of its Board of Overseers, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He is also an accomplished percussionist.

About the Ojai Music Festival
From its founding in 1947, the Ojai Music Festival has created a place for groundbreaking musical experiences, bringing together innovative artists and curious audiences in an intimate, idyllic setting 80 miles northwest of Los Angeles. The Festival presents broad-ranging programs in unusual ways with an eclectic mix of rarely performed music, refreshing juxtapositions of musical styles, and music by today’s composers. The four-day festival is a complete immersive experience with concerts, free community events, symposia, film screenings, and gatherings. Considered a highlight of the summer season, Ojai has remained a leader in the classical music landscape.

The Ojai Music Festival attracts the world’s greatest musical artists. Through its unique structure of the Artistic Director appointing an annual music director, Ojai has presented a “who’s who” of music including: Aaron Copland, Igor Stravinsky, Olivier Messiaen, Michael Tilson Thomas, Kent Nagano, Pierre Boulez, John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Spano, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, David Robertson, eighth blackbird, George Benjamin, Dawn Upshaw, Leif Ove Andsnes, Mark Morris, and Jeremy Denk.

Participation in the 2015 Ojai Music Festival
The Ojai Music Festival continues to draw thousands of curious and engaged music enthusiasts from across the country and has had record sell-out concerts over the last three years. As 2011 Music Director Dawn Upshaw commented, “There is a very special spirit of collaboration here [Ojai], fostered in part by the gorgeous natural setting and also by the friendly engagement of everyone involved.”

As tickets remain in high demand, Ojai now includes virtual opportunities to participate in the Festival experience through live video streaming of concerts. The Festival promotes year-round participation and deeper engagement through its free online courses, OjaiU, which launched in May 2013 and remains active via archives on the Festival website at www.OjaiFestival.org and on the OjaiU website at www.OjaiU.org. OjaiU returns next spring with a class of three online sessions exploring the history and world of percussion as told by 2015 Music Director Steven Schick. The free sessions will explore the history of the relationship between percussion and the culture at large. To register, visit www.OjaiFestival.org.

Festival series passes are available for the 2015 Festival and may be purchased online at OjaiFestival.org or by calling (805) 646-2053. 2015 Ojai Music Festival series passes range from $110 to $730 for reserved seating and lawn series passes start at $55. Single concert passes will be available in spring 2015. Directions to Ojai, as well as information about lodging, concierge services for visitors and other Ojai activities, are also available on the Ojai web site.

Follow Festival updates at OjaiFestival.org, Facebook (Facebook.com/ojaifestival), and Twitter (@ojaifestivals).

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Invitation to Members of the Press: For information on press passes and lodging options, please contact Gina Gutierrez at ggutierrez@ojaifestival.org.

For photos, visit the press page >>

Download 2015 Ojai Music Festival Schedule >>

 

Thomas W. Morris Continues To Shape Ojai Music Festival Artistic Direction Through Festival’s 75th Anniversary in 2021

My artistic job in building a festival comes down to two overriding goals: To build on the Ojai aesthetic of discovery, adventure, and involvement, and to provide each music director a forum to explore and experiment melding his/her musical personality with the rich heritage of this glorious festival and sublimely beautiful place. It is irresistible, exhilarating and enormous fun. Thomas W. Morris, Artistic Director

Download PDF version of press release >>

OJAI, CA November 4, 2014 — Ojai Music Festival Board President David Nygren announced that artistic director Thomas W. Morris will extend his contract through July 2021, the Festival’s 75th anniversary season. Mr. Morris was named artistic director in 2004.

Under Mr. Morris’ leadership the Festival has remained a touchstone of artistic innovation and groundbreaking exploration for leading artists and curious music enthusiasts from around the world. During his tenure, he has expanded the festival into a vibrant four-day immersive experience with more concerts performed at the Libbey Bowl and throughout the Ojai Valley, free community events, symposia, and films. Artists selected by Mr. Morris as music directors are all deeply committed to musical discovery. In 2014, he announced future music directors percussionist Steven Schick (2015), director Peter Sellars (2016) and composer/conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen (2017). Also tapped by Mr. Morris as past music directors have been eighth blackbird, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Leif Ove Andsnes, George Benjamin, Oliver Knussen, Mark Morris, Kent Nagano, David Robertson, Robert Spano, Dawn Upshaw, and most recently, Jeremy Denk. With this contract extension, Mr. Morris will continue long-term visionary artistic planning for the organization.

Prior to Mr. Morris, previous artistic directors have included John Bauer (as managing director, 1957-1954), Lawrence Morton (1954–1970, 1981–1987), Ara Guzelimian (1992-1997), and Ernest Fleischmann (1998 to 2003).

“We are thrilled that Tom has committed to the Festival through 2021. With Tom’s artistic brilliance in continuing to create a new and imaginative experience year after year, he has an innate ability to create an environment of inclusiveness for both the experienced music festival attendee and the first time attendee. Tom nurtures the creativity of each music director, blending their artistic sensibilities with the unique and beautiful setting of the Ojai Music Festival,” said Board President David Nygren. “Under Tom’s strong leadership and innovative approach, the Festival has gained international recognition and reach. He has been successful in creating community engagement events during the Festival that showcase musical artists from all over the world, creating opportunities for music lovers of all ages to participate in the festival.”

Mr. Morris said, “Working in Ojai continues to be a rich and rewarding creative experience, in not only working with artists who perform here but in building off of the incredibly active role the audience plays. They do not just sit and receive; they provide much of the artistic energy and vitality. In fact all the artists speak of the attentiveness and energy of the audience. And the possibilities of what you can do are far broader than I could have imagined. I learned that the further afield you go from the traditional concert experience (not just in repertoire, but in the concert structures and the total experience itself) the better it works.”

Artists who have served or will serve as music directors are quick to recognize the immense value and fun they experience throughout the process of imagining their Festival with Mr. Morris.

Robert Spano (2006): “There is no better time to be had than coming up with programs with Tom Morris. His encyclopedic knowledge, remarkable inventiveness, and creativity are matched only by his fantastic sense of humor. Ojai has been made an even richer place with his tenure.”

eighth blackbird (2009): “Tom was always willing to step outside the Festival’s comfort zone….He knew his audience at Ojai in minute detail, and could assess exactly how much to push their buttons, to provoke them, to give them candy as well as greens.”

Steven Schick (2015): “Tom Morris is the absolute gold standard when it comes to being an artistic partner. And the process this year in anticipation of 2015 has lived up to every expectation. It’s all about the conversations. Our conversations about music have been far-ranging and provocative. And they are always flavored with a keen awareness of the environment and traditions of the Ojai Music Festival. The result is a set of concerts that neither of us would have programmed individually but which, taken together, represent a communal view of how great music can find a home in a great festival.”

Peter Sellars (2016): “Tom Morris figured out a long time ago that the first step in being adventurous is being astute….Tom has held major establishment posts, but has always operated within them with a certain flair, a certain knack, a certain curiosity, and a certain predilection for innovation, for surprise, for change, and for a better idea….He loves to make things happen — the thrill and subtle and far-reaching shifts in organizations, programming, and new encounters with audiences is irresistible to him.”

2015 Ojai Music Festival
Ojai enthusiastically welcomes percussionist, conductor, teacher, and author Steven Schick as Music Director for the 69th Ojai Music Festival, June 11 to 14, 2015. With Mr. Morris, Mr. Schick has created an involving festival focused on 20th and 21st century composers with an abundance of music from early morning to late night. Joining him will be long-time colleagues including the International Contemporary Ensemble (“ICE”), the San Diego string ensemble Renga, pipa artist Wu Man, flutist Claire Chase, and virtuoso cellist Maya Beiser.

The Festival program will highlight music by 30 composers, half of whom are new to Ojai; the West Coast premiere of Pulitzer-prize winner John Luther Adam’s Sila: The Breath of the World; and a pre-festival celebration of the 90th birthday of Pierre Boulez on Wednesday June 10 with the west coast premiere of A Pierre Dream: A Portrait of Pierre Boulez, a multi-media kaleidoscope production with narration, archive films clips, live music, and stage sets by Frank Gehry, a part of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s Beyond the Score series.

Thomas W. Morris, Artistic Director
Thomas W. Morris was appointed artistic director of the Ojai Music Festival starting with the 2004 Festival. Recognized as one of the most innovative leaders in the orchestra industry, he has served as the long-time chief executive of both The Cleveland Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Morris is currently active nationally and internationally as a consultant, lecturer, teacher, and writer.

As artistic director of the 69-year-old Festival, Mr. Morris is responsible for artistic planning, and each year appoints a music director with whom he collaborates on shaping the Festival’s programming. During his decade-long tenure, audiences have increased and the scope of the Festival has expanded, including Ojai at Berkeley, a collaborative partnership with Cal Performances.

Mr. Morris was a founding director of Spring for Music, and served as the project’s artistic director. He currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Curtis Institute of Music and as chair of its Board of Overseers, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He is also an accomplished percussionist.

The Ojai Music Festival
From its founding in 1947, the Ojai Music Festival has created a place for groundbreaking musical experiences, bringing together innovative artists and curious audiences in an intimate, idyllic setting 80 miles northwest of Los Angeles. The Festival presents broad-ranging programs in unusual ways, giving patrons a fresh perspective on the works they hear. The four-day festival is a complete immersion experience with main concerts, free community events, symposia, film screenings, and gatherings. Considered a highlight of the summer season, Ojai has remained a leader in the classical music landscape.

The Ojai Music Festival attracts the world’s greatest musical artists. Through its unique structure of the Artistic Director appointing an annual Music Director, Ojai has presented a “who’s who” of music including: Aaron Copland, Igor Stravinsky, Olivier Messiaen, Michael Tilson Thomas, Kent Nagano, Pierre Boulez, John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Spano, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, David Robertson, eighth blackbird, George Benjamin, Dawn Upshaw, Leif Ove Andsnes, Mark Morris, and Jeremy Denk.

The Festival has also recently announced music directors for 2015–2017: Steven Schick, percussionist, for 2015; Peter Sellars, director, for 2016; and Esa-Pekka Salonen, composer/conductor, for 2017.

Series passes for the 69th Ojai Music Festival – June 11 to 14, 2015 – are on sale now. Series passes range from $730 to $120 reserved section and $90 to $55 lawn area. Tickets for the pre-festival special event celebrating the 90th birthday of Pierre Boulez are $90 for reserved section and $40 for general admission. For more information visit OjaiFestival.org or call 805 646 2094.

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Thomas W. Morris A Decade of Innovative Programming >>

Ojai Music Festival Roster of Music Directors >>

contact:
Gina Gutierrez, 805 646 2094, ggutierrez@ojaifestival.org
Nikki Scandalios, (704) 340-4094, nikki@scandaliospr.com

2014 Holiday Home Look In Entertainment Schedule

Each year, the Holiday Home Look In is enhanced by live music performed by local professional and student musicians. Check the schedule below to find your favorite area performers – and discover some new ones! 

Saturday, November 15.                                                                       

Buena Robles
10am: Saville Bloxham & Emily Gilman
12pm: Andi Starr & Bob Bishop, guitar and vocals
2pm: Hatters Tea, guitar and vocals
3pm: Caitlin Sexton, violin

Smitty and Julija

Smitty and Julija


Ojai Masonic Lodge
11am: Smitty and Julija, vocals and keyboard
1pm: David Henderson, piano
3pm: Rachel Holdt, vocals and ukelele

Las Piedras
10am: Ray Sullivan, guitar
12pm: Bonnie Griffen, flute
2pm: Audrey McPherson and Terry Wolff, flutes

 

 

Madrigali

Madrigali


Schmidt Mediterranean

10am: Charletta Erb, fiddle
12pm: Madrigali, Ojai’s own Madrigal Ensemble
2pm: George Lemire, vocals and guitar

 

 

 


Sunday, November 16

The Byle Family

The Byle Family


Buena Robles
10am: The Bassoons of Thacher
12pm: Celtic Nut, The Byle Family
2pm: Hatters Tea, guitar and vocals
3pm: Billy Russo, guitar and vocals

 

 

 

David Henderson

David Henderson


Ojai Masonic Lodge
10am: Judy Vander, piano
11:30am: Smitty and Julija, vocals and keyboard
1pm: David Henderson, piano
3pm: Rachel Holdt, vocals and ukelele

 

 

 

Ray with Guitar Small

Ray Sullivan


Las Piedras
10am: Ray Sullivan, guitar
12pm: The Adelman Family, vocals, strings and more
2pm: David Gorospe, keyboard and vocals

Schmidt Mediterranean
10am: Eliana and Elizabeth Van Renterghem, flutes
12pm: George Lemire, guitar and vocals
2pm: Caitlin Sexton, violin

 

Meet The 2014 Holiday Home Look In Designers

Each year, a different local designer takes charge of each of the houses on the Holiday Home Look In Tour. This year’s designers are Jodi Brandt (Curly Willow), Lynn Malone (Digs), and the team of Chad and Ann Carper (Chad Carper Construction and Down Home Furnishings) and Karen Hesli (Ojai’s own ‘Wreath Lady’). Read about each of the designer’s below and get a sneak peek at their inspirations and design ethos:

Ojai Masonic Lodge
Floral Design: Jodi Brandt (Curly Willow)

Jodi Brandt of Curly Willow 2Jodi Brandt has spent the last 30 years designing beautiful flower arrangements for every event imaginable including weddings, anniversaries, birthdays, corporate events, and end of life celebrations.

Jodi opened her flower shop, Curly Willow, in the fall of 2001 in Meiners Oaks.  Six years later she relocated her shop to downtown Ojai where she ran her business until 2012 when she met her fiancé. She now creates her unique and inspired designs for delivery from the ranch where they reside in the beautiful Ojai Valley.

Designing for celebrities and residents alike, her work has gained national notice and has been featured in numerous national wedding magazines.

A true artist at heart and no longer restricted by the limits of a bricks and mortar store, she has branched out into other artistic mediums including interior design consultation services. She has provided transforming insight to homeowners, renters, and small businesses and received such positive results and reviews she is now offering interior designs as an extension of Curly Willow.

“When I walk into a space I can actually see the unrealized potential. Often times it’s as simple as changing around what people already have to achieve remarkable results.“

Jodi is flattered and honored to be invited back to design floral arrangements for the 2014 Holiday Home Look In, this time with Allen and Dawn Shook’s home.

Jodi Brandt
(805) 646-6999
www.CurlyWillow-Ojai.com


Schmidt Home
Floral Design: Lynn Malone (Digs)

Lynn-Malone-4With over 20 years managing operations and fundraising endeavors for various Ojai nonprofits including the Ojai Music Festival, Lynn Malone has made an art of creating exquisite event designs on a budget.

On her 60th birthday, Lynn decided to gift herself with her own business, doing something in tune with her artistic side. She knew that it would involve nature and would not involve sitting at a desk. Serendipitously, the little flower shop at the corner of Highway 33 and Baldwin Road became available just as she was looking for what her new adventure would be. Lynn breathed new life into the shop, which is now called Digs and offers fresh cut flowers, live plants, and beautiful orchid arrangements.

Lynn enjoys creating unique floral designs for parties, weddings, and other events and is proud to be Ojai’s florist of choice for the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa. Her favorite part of the business is helping her customers give gifts of smiles to others. “Though I love the artistic challenge, the true reward is in helping people make someone else happy. Whether a thank you, congratulations, birthday, a boy giving flowers to his girlfriend, an anniversary, a get well wish, or an expression of sympathy, it’s always touching to connect with people at life’s most meaningful moments. I never anticipated the joy this would bring.”

Lynn is excited to work with Valerie and Dietrich Schmidt to integrate floral art pieces that compliment the magnificent art collection in their home. The designs you’ll see are, for the most part, interchangeable between holidays and could add visual beauty to many other occasions as well. While touring the home, imagine how each design could accent your own place or event, or be a unique floral gift for someone special.

Visit digs at www.yourdigsdesigns.com.


Las Piedras

Design: Chad Carper and Down Home Furnishings
Floral Accents: Karen Hesli

Carpers picChad Carper Construction and Down Home Furnishings are owned by Ojai natives and married couple, Chad and Anne Carper. The two have joined forces in the building and design of some of Ojai’s most noteworthy homes.

Raised in Ojai and the son of a carpenter, Chad started his career at age 18 as a union apprentice. His love of building grew with his skill and he became a General Contractor.

Established in 1988, Chad Carper Construction now brings 37 years of fine home building experience to the table. Use of local stone, hand-hewn beams and interior plaster walls have become trademarks of Carper homes. Use of top quality materials and superb craftsmanship has made Chad Carper one of the most sought-after homebuilders in Ojai. Nine of the homes previously featured in Ojai’s Holiday Home Look In were built by Chad Carper Construction.

Founded in 2000, Down Home Furnishings is known for it’s eclectic mix of imported furniture and up-scale custom upholstery. Also raised in Ojai, Anne took a more round about path to her current profession. A former accountant, she began her career in design as an importer of Indonesian and Thai antiques. After opening a retail space, she eventually added custom upholstery, lighting, window coverings and art. Down Home Furnishings is now a local center for unique interiors. Requests from customers for her design advice led to a thriving interior design business that now serves clients from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara.

www.downhomefurnishings.com

Karen Hesli, Wreath Lady
Karen-Hesli-pic
For the past 15 years, from mid-November through December, you can find the Wreath Lady next to Brian the Honey Guy at Ojai’s Farmer’s Market on Sundays.  Originally she made wreathes for gifts, and eventually friends encouraged her to launch Canyon Creations in 2001 at the Ojai Famer’s Market. A ‘hobby gone wild,’ Karen loves combining the colors and textures of nature’s bountiful pods, berries, buds, leaves and flowers into a work of art.

Each handcrafted wreath or swag celebrates nature’s beauty and is mounted on a sturdy recycled wood frame.  Harvesting a diverse palette from my own and friends’ gardens, I create holiday wreathes, wedding bowers, garlands, centerpieces and bouquets for all occasions. You can reach me at karenhesli@gmail.com.

Purchase tickets to the 2014 Holiday Home Look In, November 15-16 >>

 

A Design Preview by Digs Floral Designer, Lynn Malone

Lynn Malone, floral designer and owner of Digs Floral and Botanic Design in Ojai, will be making her Holiday Home Look In debut at the Schmidt home in Rancho Matilija. Lynn sat down to write us a blog about her plans and inspirations for the decor.

Purchase tickets to the Holiday Home Look In, November 15-16 >>

With the excitement of fall color in full bloom it was tempting to style the Schmidt home for Thanksgiving this year, but as a floral designer, I’m equally excited about holiday cheer and winter whites. When the homeowner and I met to plan the floral décor within this beautiful palette  of a home, we decided that it would be fun to use floral designs that could be versatile for both holidays so that they could be used for the entire season. In designing the florals, we agreed upon a few priorities. While a few pieces will be works of art, designed to compliment the exquisite art collection in the home, we wanted to keep many of the floral designs simple, so that guests could easily replicate them in their own homes.

Entering the home through the massive front doors, guests will be greeted with warm traditional holiday looks designed to inspire a holiday mood. Inside, fresh, contemporary holiday designs will be showcased, along with a bit of the unexpected, and a touch of whimsy here and there for fun. Floral colors have been chosen to accent the magnificent collection of artwork displayed throughout the home.

Nature will also be at play. Giant pinecones and air plants in a stunning burl wood bowl will adorn the family room and fireplace. In the master bedroom, a dress form will be decked out for the holidays in a cedar and redwood gown with floral accents.  A silver teapot will delight the senses as spicey floral “steam” comes from the spout. The massive dining table will be set for a big family feast with white pumpkins which have been repurposed for Christmas joined by stately amaryllis florals and other festive touches. For a touch of whimsy, don’t miss Rudolph in the grand children’s room or the Grinch tree on the back patio.

The design team at Digs is having so much fun preparing over 25 floral pieces for the Schmidt home on this year’s Holiday Home Look In tour. We hope you’ll enjoy them and that you’ll come on by our shop for your holiday florals and gifts.


Here are a few inspirations we found on Pinterest.  Visit the Schmidt Home at Rancho Matilija to see where we take them from here!

flower 2 flower 3 Unknownreindeer

Join Us At The 2015 Festival Launch Party – November 22

Layout 1

Join us at our 2015 Launch Party – Saturday, November 22 at 5pm at the Festival Lounge (201 S Signal St)

  • Learn more about the 2015 Festival concerts and artists from Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris
  • Meet our new Board President David Nygren
  • Enjoy the company of other music enthusiasts

Light refreshments will be served.

Free and open to the Festival community.
RSVP by emailing info@ojaifestival.org to RSVP or calling 805 646 2094. Hope to see you there!

Steven Schick 2015 Festival Playlist

2015 Music Director Steven Schick shared with us a story of how he walked from San Diego at the Mexican border to San Francisco to propose to his wife Brenda. Walking the length of the coast, Steve says, he was “constantly engaged in this world of noise….through your ears you know where we are, what we’re thinking, where we are in the world.”

In that vein, we recently asked Steve if he would make a curated playlist – a list of pieces to listen to in anticipation of the 2015 Festival. He enthusiastically responded with an annotated “Ojai Themes Listening List,” which we have put into audio and video playlists below. While we were able to find most of what was on Steve’s list online, there were some that eluded us…if you happen to stumble across them, let us know and we’ll add them in!

Listen to the playlist using Spotify and read/watch the complete list here >>

Steve’s Complete List:

Maya Beiser
Caught by the Sky with Wire – Nick Didkovsky (oo-discs)
Industry – Michael Gordon (SONY)

Both of these pieces come from my time with Bang on a Can. Maya was the founding cellist of the Bang on a Can All-Stars. I love her aching version of Michael’s piece, especially the way she leans into those shifting thirds. Nick Didkovsky’s piece is from our eponymous duo recording.

Renga
Symphony #80 – Haydn (Private recording)

Maya Beiser is one of my oldest friends and longstanding partners. Renga, which I co-lead with the wonderful violinist Kate Hatmaker., is one of the newest. From our debut concert, this version of Haydn’s mercurial Symphony #80.

red fish blue fish
Perspehassa – Iannis Xenakis (Mode Records)

One of most awe-inspiring percussion pieces of all times is Xenakis’s Persephassa. This recording is the first of many I did with red fish blue fish, the ensemble of graduate student percussionists I found at UC San Diego 20 years ago. The final five minutes of the recording, recorded in multiple tracks to realize accurately Xenakis’s indication for the extremely dense tremolos, is about as exciting as percussion music gets.

John Luther Adams
Mathematics of Resonant Bodies (Cantaloupe Records)

Listening to John’s music makes me feel like I am standing in powerful surf: excitement is always tempered by the sense that you’re about to lose your footing. The titanic and tidal Mathematics of Resonant Bodies has been the touchstone for our long friendship.

Varèse
Amériques (1922 version)

On the first day of my first visit to New York City, I walked from a friend’s apartment on the Upper West Side down the length of Manhattan to stand outside of Edgard Varèse’s house on Sullivan Street. I now know that apartment as the home of my friend Chou Wen-chung and his wife Yi-an. But on that cool sunny day in early November of 1977 all I could think of when I stood in front of the famous door was that this was where Varèse lived and worked. Even though Amériques was composed before he bought the Sullivan Street house, it has come to symbolize Varèse deep resonance with New York. You don’t have to listen very hard to hear the sounds of the city he loved.

PERCUSSION
Tabla Solo in Japthal – Ustad Alla Rakha

Drum set solos – Elvin Jones, Art Blakey, Sunny Murray

I include two clips of non-Western percussion pieces to underscore the solidarity I feel with all percussionists, whatever their tradition. I also like to remind myself that, as we celebrate the percussive art as one of the advance guards of contemporary music, it also has a global tradition thousands of years.

Gamelan Gong Kebyar

Gene Kruppa and Barbara Stanwick “Drum Boogie”…
…and then his encore!

VOICE
Hurt – Johnny Cash (He lived in Casitas Springs)

I love the “beautiful un-beautiful” voice. And there are lots of great examples. I chose this late song from Johnny Cash – a cover of Trent Rezner’s “Hurt” – for two reasons: Firstly, he Johnny Cash lived for a while in Casitas Springs, just down the road from Ojai, and secondly because, well, he’s Johnny Cash. My “WWJCD” wrist band stands for “What would Johnny Cash do?”

Equatorial – Edgard Varèse
Los Hermanos – Mercedes Souza

Two very different songs with roots in Latin America. Varèse’s mysterious and magisterial Ecuatorial, here in the version for male chorus and ensemble instead of soloist evokes a people in contact with their primal environment. In Mercedes Souza’s account of Atahualpa Yupanqui’s Los Hermanos, we hear people in contact with each other. Los Hermanos was the anthem of the dissident left-wing under the dictatorships in Argentina and Chile. “Tengo tantos hermanos que no los puedo contra…y una hermana muy hermosa qui se llama libertad.”

Quatre Chansons – Gérard Grisey
Le Voce sotto Vetro –  Salvatore Sciarinno

ROLAND AUZET
Fejben zsonglőrködő férfiak

What I love about Roland’s art is the precision with which he views the theatrical space. For him a simple movement, like raising the gaze, is to be as disciplined and refined a gesture as a Mozartean cadence. This clip of his two-person show, with juggler Jerome Thoma, shows that in abundance. The precision of the visual counterpoint is dizzying!

SOUNDS OF TRAVELING
I’ve Been Everywhere – Johnny Cash
Atmospheres – Gyorgy Ligeti
Two of Us – The Beatles

These are pretty self-explanatory. Johnny Cash takes us on a tour of American cities. Ligeti takes us even farther away into a sound world of pure imagination. Two of Us was a rare amicable moment in the Beatles contentious last album. One of the great love songs of all times, it celebrates the Lennon/McCartney friendship.

And finally the encore!

Mr. Bean’s Invisible Drum Set

I include it because it’s funny, of course. But behind the humor is a fundamental truth about percussion music: It’s not percussion instruments that define as much as the gestures of performance. Percussionists from widely disparate traditions, playing very different instruments, and having very different personal histories, all make the same physical gestures. The hand lifts and then, whether with or without holding a stick, falls to meet an instrument. This physical arc and the sweet kink of contact with the surface of an instrument (or in Rowan Atkinson’s case with an imagined surface) rather any particular sound that is produced is what makes a percussionist.

 

Explore Stunning Homes at the 18th Annual Holiday Home Look In – November 15-16

 

Celebrate the festive seasons at the 18th Annual Holiday Home Look In
November 15 & 16, 2014 | 10am to 4pm

Purchase tickets at the Holiday Marketplace – 703 El Paseo Rd.
Tickets are $35 a person.

Download $5 off coupon for day of the event >>

The Ojai Festivals Women’s Committee invites guests on a tour of four distinctive Ojai Valley homes celebrating the art of living and unique approaches to the festive seasons. The 18th Holiday Home Look In, November 15 and 16, is known for highlighting architectural contrasts within the Ojai Valley, a unique feature compared to other home tours in the area.

The 2014 homes reflect four diverse architectural styles, starting with a Masonic Lodge built in 1927 and transformed recently into a private residence in the Palladian manner. There is also a beautiful Craftsman in the Greene & Greene style. Completed just seven months ago, it looks like it’s been in place 100 years. The remaining two homes pay homage to contemporary Mediterranean and Spanish influences. Each features exceptional tree- and landscapes and extensive art collections ranging from cowgirl pop to black & white master photography.

In addition, the annual Holiday Marketplace takes places the same weekend at the Matilija Junior High School Gymnasium (701 El Paseo Road) with more than 40 vendors and artisans. Admission to the marketplace is free. Click here for details >>

The tour and marketplace benefit the Ojai Music Festival and its BRAVO program in the schools and community, which offer free workshops and performances to Ojai Valley public schools and the community.

The tour price is $30 per person advance and $35 day of the event. A group discount is also available for 8 or more people. For the group discount, please call 805 646 2094.

Organizers request no cameras allowed on the tour or children under 12 years of age. Comfortable shoes are highly recommended (no high-heeled shoes allowed). Shuttle service will be provided for one of the homes.

Read more about the homes featured on the tour >>

Meet Candida Condor: New Festival Subscriber

 

Robert Spano conducts the performance of The Rothko Chapel by the Ojai Festival Singers

Robert Spano conducts the performance of “Rothko Chapel ” by the Ojai Festival Singers at the Saturday Late Night concert.

“Earlier this year, 2014, a very dear friend of mine, Annat Provo, invited me to share her series tickets to the Ojai Music Festival. Although I have heard of the Festival for years, I had not attended before. I was delighted to accept her generosity!

The quantity, quality and variety of experience offered by the Festival surprised me. I loved going up to Meditation Mount in the early morning, and staying up late in the balmy evening to be transported by Rothko Chapel – my new favorite music.

Another delightful surprise was the interesting conversation we had with those seated around us. One handsome fellow sitting just in front of me told us about the Rothko Chapel in Houston, about the large canvases hung on the four walls of the spacious room. About the natural light built into the design of the building so that the canvases constantly change as the sun and clouds move across the sky. If I go to Houston, I won’t miss it! And I’ll have the music on my iPod…

Another delightful man, and long-time Festival friend of my friend, was so knowledgeable about the music, the musicians and the composers, and shared so graciously, he brought a greater depth to our appreciation and enjoyment of the excellently executed performances.

I was struck by the community atmosphere I felt everywhere I went. It was such a friendly, warm and welcoming experience. I felt embraced by the music, the town, the weather, and everyone I encountered.

So I now have my own series season ticket and seat — sitting right next to my good friend!”

– submitted by Candida Condor

Have a story to share? Send us an email at ggutierrez@ojaifestival.org 

Visit our online box office >

Watch the Saturday Late Night featuring Rothko Chapel >

Fluid Borders: The Boundless World of Percussionists

7.11.13Percussionists are different. Their musical world has no fixed boundaries; there is no limit to the instruments they play and the sounds they make. There are no pretentious barriers between nature and artifice, no strictures on performing indoors or out. Their precursors reach back to the dawn of time and members of their guild are found in every culture. Hand a percussionist a random rock or the most exquisitely forged gong and he or she will make it speak, sometimes with breathtaking virtuosity born of the simplest gestures by which we interact, though touch, with our material world. So what does it mean that Ojai’s 2015 music director is a percussionist? Quite a lot if that percussionist is Steven Schick.

No one has done more to champion, interpret, and expand the repertory of contemporary percussion music than Steven Schick. Not only has he mastered the entire solo repertory – and more than doubled its size through commissions – but as a conductor, educator, and author he has deepened our understanding of the role of percussion in music’s past, present, and future. More importantly, as an artist of broad interests and deep convictions he has explored cultural issues well beyond the already boundless frontiers of his chosen specialization.

To a percussionist’s ear music begins with rhythm, color, and gesture and these are the elements that form the nexus of the diverse works and decidedly international array of composers of this all 20th– and 21st-century festival. Naturally, we’ll hear Steven Schick perform classics of the solo percussion repertory – compositions by Stockhausen, Xenakis, and Globokar, as well as more recent compositions by David Lang and Kaija Saariaho, and the American premiere of Roland Auzet’s staging of Kurt Schwitter’s Dadist masterpiece, Ursonate. But Steve will also conduct ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble), red fish blue fish, Renga, and musicians from CalArts, groups with which he is closely identified, in a broad array of ensemble works of varied scorings, including the West Coast premiere of John Luther Adams’ Sila. Among the distinguished soloists is cellist Maya Beiser playing pieces by Osvaldo Golijov, Michael Harrison, and Chinary Ung.

Other highlights are a sunrise performance of Morton Feldman’s For Philip Guston in which Steve is joined by flutist Claire Chase and pianist Sarah Rothenberg, Lou Harrison’s Concerto for Pipa featuring Wu Man, and Messiaen’s Vision de l’amen with pianists Gloria Cheng and Vicki Ray. This year’s “old timers” include Copland, Chavez, Ginastera, and Varèse, all with scores new to Ojai, save one late-night chestnut: Appalachian Spring.

2015 marks the beginning of a three-year celebration of Ojai’s roots in Southern California, where open exploration and cross-cultural dialogue are written into the DNA. It is therefore especially apt that this festival opens with a Wednesday night multimedia tribute to Pierre Boulez, seven-time festival director, on the occasion of his 90th birthday. Four concerts are devoted to his music, each in creative juxtaposition with works by Béla Bartók: the six string quartets and, as the finale, the Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion. This means Steven Schick will have the last word: a snare drum diminuendo with which he ushers us across the fluid borders of his imagination into silence.

– Christopher Hailey

Christopher Hailey is a music historian specializing in new music. He is the Ojai Music Festival’s longtime annotator and host of Concert Insights, the Festival’s in-depth discussions held before each concert.

Listen and view Steven Schick’s playlist >>

Embrace the Ojai Experience! Purchase your series passes now >>

Q & A With New Board President David Nygren

D Nygren

The Ojai Music Festival is pleased to announce the appointment of David Nygren as president of the board of directors, effective August 2014. David, who has served on the Ojai board since 2011, is the founder and CEO of Nygren Consulting LLC, which specializes in mergers and acquisitions, board effectiveness, organizational strategy, and executive competency assessment. His company balances Fortune 500 for-profit businesses with the non-profit sector where he works extensively with health systems and arts institutions including the New York Philharmonic and New World Symphony.

David was also the executive vice president at DePaul University, where he was awarded rank and tenure in the department of Psychology, teaching organizational theory and design, leadership, and corporate governance.

He assumes leadership of the board after Stephen (Mike) J.M. Morris, who served an extraordinary year of service as president. Mike will continue to serve on the Festival’s executive committee for a smooth transition.

Recently, David spoke with us about coming on the Ojai board, as well as his favorite Ojai moments.

OMF: What are some of your most memorable moments from past Festivals?

DN: My favorite moments are in the splendor of what we experience only here. I marvel at [artistic director] Tom Morris’ brilliance in convening artists from around the world in this beautiful setting and at the spell of their performances.

These have included the toy piano concert in the Libbey Park playground, the surprise appearance of the marching band last year, and early morning concerts at Meditation Mount. What strikes me over and over is the profound humility of the musicians when they take their bow, show their delight, and rejoice in the intimacy of the audience.

OMF: You have served on many non-profit boards and are often asked to serve; what made you choose the Ojai Music Festival?

DN: My willingness to join and support the Festival comes from a deep love of music and my belief in the power of creativity to change the face of the world. As a result, I make personal investments in organizations whose intent it is to advance the common good.

There is nothing quite like Ojai where this level of creativity is inserted in the beauty of the Ojai Valley, where the mountains and the music are in harmony. The most talented artists come together here to express their potential and give us that gift. I have traveled and visited many festivals on other continents…None compare to the experience of the Ojai Music Festival.

OMF: What are you looking for when you join a board?

DN: When I think about joining a board, I think about my passion for the mission of the organization, and I expect the same drive, commitment, and enthusiasm from my fellow board members. On the Ojai Music Festival board, I have found a group that professes a love of the mission and whose eyes light up as soon as we talk about Tom’s programming. This group is intellectually alive, deeply committed financially, and anxious to know about the next innovation.

In Ojai, we have a committed board, extraordinary artistic direction with Tom Morris, and an exceptional guide in [executive director] Janneke Straub.

OMF: Your consulting firm is well-known for facilitating company and organizational growth through effective leadership and long-term strategies. What would you say today’s challenges are for arts non-profit organizations?

DN: The challenges of all arts organizations today are relevance to the communities they serve and financial viability. Neither will hold back the Ojai Music Festival, which is the most deserving arts organization in Southern California. It is my hope as the new president, that California and beyond will continue to support the enormous innovations that are happening in Ojai.

Read about Nygren Consulting >>

Enjoy Concerts From The Festival With Our Live Stream Library

Friday Evening Concert - June 13, 2014
Friday Evening Concert - June 13, 2014

World Premiere of 'The Classical Style: An Opera (of sorts)'. Libretto: Jeremy Denk, Composer: Steven Stucky

Thursday Evening Concert - June 12, 2014
Thursday Evening Concert - June 12, 2014

Pianist Jeremy Denk performs at the 68th Ojai Music Festival at Libbey Bowl followed by "Mahler Reimagined" with the Uri Caine Ensemble.

Saturday Morning Concert - June 14, 2014
Saturday Morning Concert - June 14, 2014

Music of Charles Ives with Jeremy Denk, Jennifer Frautschi and Hudson Shad

2014 Ojai Music Festival - The Knights, Storm Large and Hudson Shad
2014 Ojai Music Festival - The Knights, Storm Large and Hudson Shad

2014 Ojai Music Festival - "Jupiter" Symphony and "Canonade"
2014 Ojai Music Festival - "Jupiter" Symphony and "Canonade"

The 2014 Festival morning concert featured The Knights performing Mozart's "Jupiter" Symphony followed by the second half called “Canonade” conceived by Music Director Jeremy Denk as “a mélange of musical canons and canon-esque miscellaney” with selected works by Josquin, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Kurtág, Purcell, P.D.Q. Bach, Uri Caine, and J.S. Bach.

2014 Ojai Music Festival - Friday Late Night with Uri Caine Sextet
2014 Ojai Music Festival - Friday Late Night with Uri Caine Sextet

Pianist/Composer Uri Caine and his Uri Caine Sextet reimagine the music of George Gershwin including "Rhapsody in Blue" at the ever-popular Late Nights at Libbey Bowl during the 2014 Ojai Music Festival.

2014 Ojai Music Festival - Friday Late Night with Uri Caine Sextet
2014 Ojai Music Festival - Saturday Late Night
2014 Ojai Music Festival - Saturday Late Night

Violinist Jennifer Frautschi opens the Saturday Late Night concert with a performance of Bach's Violin Sonata No. 3, followed by Morton Feldman's 'Rothko Chapel', performed by the Ojai Festival Singers and members of The Knights, led by Robert Spano.

Use the drop-downs to view program information:

Thursday Talks - June 12, 2014 - coming soon!

1:00 PM – Ojai Community Church

Part I: Festival Overview with Jeremy Denk
Part II: An Ensemble for the 21st Century: The Musician’s View
with Eric and Colin Jacobsen, founders of The Knights
Ara Guzelimian, Ojai Talks director

Thursday Evening Concert - June 12, 2014

8:00 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Jeremy Denk, piano
Uri Caine Ensemble

Selections from Janáček’s On An Overgrown Path interwoven with short works by Schubert
URI CAINE: Mahler Re-Imagined – The music of Gustav Mahler viewed through Uri Caine’s lens of transformation and improvisation

Friday Talks - June 13, 2014

1:00 PM – Ojai Community Church

The Classical Style: Impact and Implications
Part I: Jeremy Denk on Charles Rosen
Part II: An in-depth panel discussion on the award-winning book, The Classical Style, with Timo Andres and Don M. Randel
Part III: Mary Birnbaum, director, and Steven Stucky, composer

Friday Evening Concert - June 13, 2014

8:00 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

HAYDN: String Quartet in G minor, Op. 74, No.3, “Rider”
JEREMY DENK / STEVEN STUCKY: The Classical Style: An Opera (of Sorts)WORLD PREMIERE


Friday Late Night Concert - June 13, 2014

10:30 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Uri Caine Sextet

The music of George Gershwin, including Rhapsody in Blue, reimagined and improvised by Uri Caine

Saturday Morning Concert - June 14, 2014

11:00 AM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Jennifer Frautschi, violin
Jeremy Denk, piano

IVES: Sonatas for Violin and Piano, Nos. 1-4 (complete)

Saturday Evening Concert I - June 14, 2014 - coming soon!

6:00 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Jeremy Denk, piano
Timo Andres, piano
Alex Sopp, flute
Colin Jacobsen, violin
Miranda Sielaff, viola
Eric Jacobsen, cello

The Knights
Eric Jacobsen, conductor

ANDREW NORMAN: Light Screens
MOZART / TIMO ANDRES: Coronation Concerto Re-composition

Saturday Evening Concert II - June 14, 2014 - coming soon!

8:00 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Storm Large, vocalist
Hudson Shad Quartet
The Knights
Eric Jacobsen, conductor

BOCCHERINI (arr. The Knights): String Quintet in C major Op. 30, No. 6 – “La musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid”
IVES: Three Places in New England (1930 version)
FELDMAN: Madame Press Died Last Week at Ninety
STOCKHAUSEN (arr. Caroline Shaw): Tierkreis – Leo
WEILL: Seven Deadly Sins (in English)


Saturday Late Night Concert - June 14, 2014

10:30 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Jennifer Frautschi, violin
Members of The Knights
Max Mandel, viola
Joseph Gramley, percussion
Steven Beck, celesta
Ojai Festival Singers
Robert Spano, conductor

J.S. BACH: Violin Sonata No. 3 in C major, BWV 1005
FELDMAN: Rothko Chapel

Sunday Morning Concert - June 15, 2014

11:00 AM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Timo Andres, piano
Jeremy Denk, piano
Lisa Kaplan, piano
Uri Caine Ensemble
Hudson Shad

The Knights
Eric Jacobsen, conductor

MOZART: Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551, “Jupiter”
Canonade: A “mélange of musical canons and canon-esque miscellaney” with selected works by Josquin, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Kurtág, Purcell, P.D.Q. Bach, Uri Caine, and J.S. Bach

Sunday Evening Concert - June 15, 2014

5:30 PM – Libbey Bowl, Ojai, CA

Jeremy Denk, piano
Ojai Festival Singers
The Knights
Kevin Fox, Eric Jacobsen, conductors

LIGETI: Piano Études Books I & II
IVES: Psalm 90
BEETHOVEN: Fantasy in C Minor for Piano, Chorus, and Orchestra, Op.80, “Choral Fantasy”


2014 Festival Audience Survey Results

Each year, the Festival conducts an audience survey as an ongoing effort to measure various aspects of our own performance and receive feedback from patrons. Below are the results from this past Festival in June. We strive to improve our efforts and appreciate our Festival community’s interest in our forward plans.

We welcome any additional comments and observations. Please email us at info@ojaifestival.org or write your comments below.


Survey invitations were e-mailed to 2014 Festival attendees the week following the event. Of a total of 678 delivered, 323 were returned for a response rate of 48%.

Survey 1

survey slide 2a

survey slide 2

survey slide 8

survey slide 7


 Ratings for the following:

1. Food Trucks on Friday Night:

  • Excellent 16%
  • Good 41%
  • Adequate 18%
  • Fair 13%
  • Poor 12%
  • Comments: Just didn’t have time to try the food trucks and would love to have done so….perhaps more than one night; more food truck varieties; more places to sit

2. Saturday Supper at Libbey Park

  • Excellent 45%
  • Good 33%
  • Adequate 17%
  • Fair 2%
  • Poor 3%

3. Live Streaming

  • Excellent 21%
  • Good 56%
  • Adequate 18%
  • Fair 3%
  • Poor 2%
  • Comments: Live streaming and intermission interviews seen after returning home; loved it!

4. Gathering Place in Libbey Park

  • Excellent 41%
  • Good 45%
  • Adequate 11%
  • Fair 2%
  • Poor 1%

View complete PDF >>


Selections of Enthusiastic Patrons’ Memorable Moments
There were so many memorable moments that were shared. Here are several to read online, or read 2014 Selections of Memorable Moments

Hands down: The Classical Style. We loved it and wished we could sit through it twice. (Two of us are trained musically; the third, just a music lover.) Next I’d have to say Jeremy Denk playing the Ligeti Etudes.

I wished I could spend all four days in Ojai. The organization was perfect. Enough restrooms, very clean. I watched afterwards the videos and the program and artists are outstanding. Also very funny especially my first language is German.

Listening to the musicians at the Gazebo on Friday and hearing Storm.

Lying with my young son under the giant oak on the lawn listening to Mozart on a gorgeous Sunday morning and getting a picture that captured the moment – smiles all around.

Sitting in the middle of the choir at Sunday Sunrise concert.  My whole body was immersed in the sound, and my soul was deeply touched by the power of the voices around me.

Both Late night concerts were excellent.  I loved the discussions on Thu and Fri but must admit that I liked Jeremy’s discussion of the idea of the opera more than the opera itself.  Brooklyn Rider and that venue were amazing but so was Sun morning at Meditation Mount and I am not a choral lover usually.

Sunday morning: sitting in that beautiful bowl with the trees and their dappled sunlight and listening to Mozart and the bird’s responses.  It was exquisite.

 

5 Things to Expect In 2015 Including Pipa Player Wu Man

ICE

The “hot” ensemble heading to Ojai next year will be ICE (International Chamber Ensemble).

Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris and Music Director Steven Schick have a lot to share about the 2015 Ojai Music Festival these next 11 months. Plans are underway and we thought we’d give you a glimpse of 5 things to get you started.

1. Performances of works by 19 living composers new to Ojai. Read more about it here >>

2. The West Coast premiere of John Luther Adam’s Sila: The Breath of the World. Learn more about his new outdoor work which makes its world premiere at the Lincoln Center Out of Doors. Click here >>

3. Festival debuts by ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble), pipa virtuoso Wu Man,  cellist Maya Beiser, and San Diego based chamber ensemble Renga

4. Schick Machine directed by Paul Dresher performed by Steven Schick – a visually compelling world of mechanical devices, invented instruments, and seemingly infinite sonic possibilities. Watch here >>

5. A special pre-Festival event on Wednesday, June 10 of Pierre Boulez: A Portrait, a spectacular multi-media kaleidoscope production with narration, archive films clips, live music, and stage set by Frank Gehry, part of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s Beyond the Score series.

There is so much more to share. Stay tuned as more details are in the works!

Save your seat for an intriguing program of music, talks, events, films, and more. Buy Online >>

Call us at 805 646 2053 for questions about seats or our payment plan.

Enjoy 2014 Live Streaming Concerts

68th Ojai Music Festival - Libbey Bowl - June 14, 2014

Fred Child of American Public Media’s Performance Today interviews Jeremy Denk, music director, during one of the intermission interviews during the 68th Ojai Music Festival. Photo by Timothy Norris.

Libbey Bowl Concerts and Ojai Talks of the 68th Ojai Music Festival, June 12–15, are now archived on our Festival website for your viewing pleasure.

A highlight of this year’s 2014 Ojai Live offerings includes the June 13 world premiere of the new opera with libretto by Jeremy Denk and music by Steven Stucky, The Classical Style: An Opera (of Sorts). The Classical Style: An Opera (of Sorts) is co-commissioned by the Ojai Music Festival, Cal Performances at UC Berkeley, Carnegie Hall, and the Aspen Music Festival and School. The Ojai premiere is supported by a generous grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This year, Ojai Live features an enhanced HD five-camera shoot with concert-quality sound produced by Little Dog Live (http://www.LittleDogLive.com). Intermission interviews with artists and special guests were hosted by Fred Child of American Public Media’s Performance Today.

Now in its 68th year, the Ojai Music Festival celebrates its audience whose interest has resulted in record sales. The concentrated four-day Festival draws thousands of curious and engaged music enthusiasts from across the country, and is pleased to serve a growing community worldwide via these live and archival webcasts.

Watch the stream of the Friday evening concert below and view more videos on the archives here >>

Support New Music, New Ideas, New Learning: Make A Gift To The Festival

68th Ojai Music Festival - Libbey Bowl - June 13, 2014

Led by Artistic Director Tom Morris and Music Director Jeremy Denk, the 68th Ojai Music Festival will be remembered for its amazing concerts and witty, thought-provoking programs.

This record breaking year was marked by sold out performances, the world premiere of Steven Stucky and Jeremy Denk’s comic opera, The Classical Style: An Opera (of Sorts), a substantial increase in impact thanks to the residency of American Public Media’s Fred Child (Performance Today), and enhanced live video streaming, which has already attracted over 7,000 views from 43 countries. All Libbey Bowl concerts and Ojai Talks are now available to view on our website for free.

This is just the beginning. The Festival’s creative spirit and commitment to nurturing the musicians of today is stronger than ever. Led by Music Director Steven Schick, the 2015 Ojai Music Festival will include works by 20 living composers. With future Music Directors, Peter Sellars in 2016 and Esa-Pekka Salonen in 2017, Steve will open the door to 70 more years of adventurous programming.

We invite you to join us by making a donation by fiscal year end (July 31) and ensure a vibrant future. We support new music, new ideas, new love, and learning. It is our commitment and investment in collective creativity that sets the Ojai Music Festival apart.

Your support is important to us, to the musicians and to the Ojai community.

Make a donation here >>

Read the 2014 Festival Reviews

Bowl day shot

Each June, the Ojai Valley becomes a musical epicenter where audience members, industry leaders, musicians, and members of the press come together and experience innovative programming.

After each Festival, we gather feedback from audience members and colleagues, as well as share press reviews of the 2014 Festival. Read excerpts from the media, and for your convenience, download a complete press review sheet as a PDF here >>

“Like all births, there is something new in the room that wasn’t there before. For Stucky and Denk, this is a fleeting instant of transcendence, namely a miracle.”

Los Angeles Times


“’The Classical Style’ is a mash-up of Glenn Gould at his most satirical, PDQ Bach at his sauciest and a distractedly erudite Rosen cooking up a French sauce while pontificating on harmonic structure in his kitchen. But underlying the jokes (good ones and the groaners) and tomfoolery, Stucky’s resourceful score and Denk’s droll text produce an ingeniously eloquent musing on the meaning of life.”

Los Angeles Times

Read Mark Swed’s wrap-up review >>


“…the concert’s second half was a revelation, with the American pianist and composer Uri Caine and his jazz sextet deconstructing aspects of Gustav Mahler’s oeuvre, including the Adagietto of his Fifth Symphony and the conclusion of “Das Lied von der Erde” (for which a cantor was added). Teasing out the earthy building blocks of these complex and deeply felt masterpieces—that is, the folk songs, military marches and Jewish wedding tunes—Mr. Caine and company reimagined Mahler’s Olympian creations in more human-scale terms.”

Wall Street Journal


“On Saturday morning, he [Jeremy Denk] and Jennifer Frautschi performed with exquisite concentration all four of Ives’s Violin Sonatas, over the cawing of a multitude of crows. In typical Ojai fashion, the experience was enhanced by the presence of the vocal ensemble Hudson Shad…”

Wall Street Journal


“…the definitive factor in Ojai, the thing that sets its apart from ordinary concert life, is the programming. Take that away and you just have pretty concerts in a park. For the listening gourmet, Ojai is the place to taste new things, in abundance, and take a break from Tchaikovsky and Brahms meat and potatoes.”

Orange County Register

Read Tim Mangan’s two reviews: June 13 issue and June 15 issue


“…the pleasantly nostalgic backdrop offered by Stucky’s well-crafted and wide-ranging score, which empliys faux 18th-century music up to Strauss and Stucky himself. Throughout, conductor Robert Spano showed the Knights, the festival’s ‘resident’ orchestra, at their transparent best.” – Musical America


“He [Jeremy Denk] proved to be a terrific fit for this quirky, brainy, adventuresome little festival…”

Classical Voice North America


“…the area’s most consistently thrilling annual event, there was plenty of incredible music to swoon over, obsess about, or just ponder, albeit in new ways.”

Santa Barbara Independent


“From that felicitous combination came an effervescent joy in music that Denk emanates by simply being himself, a man of wit and wonder and a performer of infinite possibilities. Musicians and audience alike couldn’t stop smiling with obvious delight as they shared in his bit of musical heaven.”

– Ventura County Star


The Seven Deadly Sins (libretto by Brecht) was a lot of fun, and well sung by bombshell Storm Large, portraying a woman who experienced all seven and then some, and quartet Hudson Shad.

– Culture Clash
Read Scott Timberg’s review from June 19 >>


Conductors Eric Jacobson & Kevin Fox, alongside New York’s versatile orchestral collective The Knights and the Ojai Festival Singers left the mixed-age audience of both locals and visitors enraptured by the scope of the multiplicitous beauty and wide-ranging inquiry of the festival’s finale.

I Care If You Listen 

Jeremy Denk, In Words and Music: Read The Los Angeles Times Article

by Barbara Isenberg
June 2, 2014

jeremy-denk-2012-sqThese are illustrious times for the pianist and writer Jeremy Denk. Last year he won a MacArthur “genius” Fellowship, was named Musical America’s Instrumentalist of the Year and signed a book contract to expand a New Yorker article about piano lessons.

A few months ago, he received the $75,000 Avery Fisher Prize, and in a few weeks he heads west to become music director of the 68th annual Ojai Music Festival. The festival, starting June 12, should offer a change of pace for Denk. Instead of his usual concertizing across the U.S., Europe and elsewhere, he’ll be in residence at the four-day festival — and in charge.

“I’ve never curated anything like this before,” the 44-year-old musician said over coffee on the Upper West Side. “I’ve never had the responsibility for a weekend’s stimulation.”

Denk had been friendly with Rosen, who died last year at 85, and greatly admired Rosen’s “The Classical Style.”

He had never written an opera libretto before, either. But besides curating the festival and performing there, he’s come up with “The Classical Style: An Opera [of Sorts],” which will be given its premiere in Ojai. Based on pianist Charles Rosen’s 1971 scholarly book, “The Classical Style,” with music by composer Steven Stucky, the comic opera features such things as Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn playing Scrabble in heaven.

Read the complete article >>

 

 

The Lawn Experience: Tips and FAQ

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Thank you for being a part of our Festival lawn area! The lawn is a special experience for Festival patrons – it’s the place to enjoy a picnic before the concert; meet with a group of friends or family; and lie down to stargaze while enjoying the Festival’s music.

To help you enjoy the lawn, here are some things to know:

 

  • The right side of the lawn is designated for taller chairs and the left side for low-rise chairs.  (A low-rise, beach-style chair is a chair with legs of 10 inches or shorter and an overall height limit of 28 inches.) Patrons with higher-rise chairs, such as camping or deck chairs, will be asked to move to the right side or rear of the lawn so as not to hinder the views of others.
  • Line up early! Lawn lines start as early as two hours before a concert begins. There are two lines for lawn patrons – the left is designated for lawn series subscribers with an access pass and the right for single pass holders.
  • Save your place! Lawn series pass subscribers have the opportunity to save their spot on the lawn between the morning and evening concerts; please use the “Save My Spot” card mailed with your passes.
  • Store it! If you are attending two concerts in one day, you can also place your lawn chairs and blankets near the lawn entrance gate between concerts.  Please do not leave personal belongings as Festival staff cannot be responsible for items left unattended.
  • The Libbey Bowl and Park is a no-smoking and alcohol-free zone designated by the City of Ojai.
  • Ojai weather can be quite unpredictable! During the evening concerts we highly recommend bringing a warm blanket and for the day bringing sunscreen and wearing a hat in case it gets too hot.
  • At the Festival there are food vendors who will have a variety of light food options and beverages. For a greater variety, you can head to the various eateries within walking distance from the Bowl. Visit www.OjaiFestival.org for suggestions.
  • We’re happy to have children enjoy concerts; however, we know they can become restless! If your child needs to stretch their legs, please take them outside the Bowl so as not to disrupt the concert experience for other lawn patrons.

 

*For the Friday Evening concert featuring the world premiere of The Classical Style: The incline of the lawn is fairly low in relation to the Libbey Bowl stage. For this concert, we will have a small area on the left side for better viewing. Please see the head usher that evening.*

 

Thank you and enjoy!