Congratulations to our friend and collaborator Tyshawn Sorey on his appointment as a MacArthur Fellow. Tyshawn’s astonishing creativity has been so evident in Ojai for the last two Festivals – 2016 with Peter Sellars and Julia Bullock, and in 2017 with Vijay Iyer (Sellars and Iyer are themselves MacArthur Fellows). Ojai is an incubator for artists and music, and we can all be proud to see these so honored and recognized with this exciting award. Wonderful and well-deserved news, Tyshawn.” – Thomas W. Morris

The MacArthur Foundation recently announced their Class of 2017 recipients popularly referred to as a “genius grant.” This esteemed list included two-time Festival alum Tyshawn Sorey.  A release from The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation cited Sorey for “assimilating and transforming ideas from a broad spectrum of musical idioms and defying distinctions between genres, composition, and improvisation in a singular expression of contemporary music.”

The Foundation website summarizes Tyshawn’s work: 

A virtuosic percussionist and drum set player who is fluent in piano and trombone, Sorey is an ever-curious explorer of the nature of sound and rhythm, ensemble behavior, and the physicality of live performance. He erodes distinctions among musical genres as well as the line between composition and improvisation and incorporates sophisticated rhythmic and harmonic phrasing, highly prescribed improvisational sound worlds, and real-time experimentation with sound, among many other structural elements. At the same time, he possesses a refined sense of restraint and balance that allows him to maintain his own unique voice while bringing a vast array of musical settings to life. He explores various World and Eastern musical and philosophical concepts on his albums Koan (2009) and Alloy (2014), employing musical languages that range from slowly developing tonally and pantonally based music to free atonal pieces that contain irregular rhythms, lyrical phrasing, and distinctive pacing. Inner Spectrum of Variables (2015) features an extended composition in six movements that merges the harmonic and melodic vocabularies of Western classical, American, and Ethiopian creative expressions, free improvisation, and twentieth-century avant-garde musical traditions. In his song cycle Perle Noire: Meditations for Josephine (2016), Sorey reimagines the legendary Josephine Baker’s works; his original recreations of songs sung by Baker reflect both the context of her contributions to the civil rights movement and contemporary incidences of racial injustice. Sorey challenges expectations of jazz piano trio performance on Verisimilitude (2017), a set of five abstract, enigmatic, and austere pieces in which the delineation between spontaneous and formal composition is even more obscured.

In addition to his own work as a composer, conductor, and ensemble leader, Sorey’s prowess as a percussionist and drum set player is well known, and he continues to be in high demand as a sideman for popular creative artists. With his genre-free approach to making music and continuous experimentation, Sorey is rapidly emerging as a singular talent in contemporary musical composition and performance.

The Ojai Music Festival congratulates Tyshawn for joining the ranks of these creative and forward-thinking individuals. Read more here >

“It’s like a dream – to be able to play and hear my most beloved musical pieces of our time over the course of only a few days, and to share it with the audience members of the most vibrant and progressive festival on the American continent – Ojai. These pieces changed my life; I hope ¬ they will find a very special place also in your souls.” – Patricia Kopatchinskaja

 

“When I first met Patricia Kopatchinskaja, I knew she was a natural to be Music Director of the Ojai Music Festival. Her unstoppable energy, blazing virtuosity, and relentless curiosity are irresistible, as she demonstrated at the Festival’s Ears Open event in Ojai a year ago. The 2018 Festival will be a showcase of her creativity – as a violinist, as a collaborator, as a programmer, and as a commentator on our time. Patricia sees music in the context of today’s social and political issues so the 2018 Festival is one that will surely offer confrontation, questioning, and healing.” – Thomas W. Morris

The Ojai Music Festival is proud to present Patricia Kopatchinskaja as Music Director of the 2018 Festival (June 7-10) in her West Coast debut. Joining Patricia, will be the Mahler Chamber Orchestra in its first extended United States residency.

The Mahler Chamber Orchestra was founded in 1997 based on the shared vision of being a free and international ensemble, dedicated to creating and sharing exceptional experiences in classical music. With 45 members spanning 20 different countries at its core, the MCO works as a nomadic collective of passionate musicians uniting for specific tours in Europe and across the world. Based in Berlin, the Mahler Chamber Orchestra forms the basis of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra and has long and fruitful artistic relationships with major artists, including Patricia and Mitsuko Uchida, Ojai’s 2021 Music Director.

In Ojai, the Mahler Chamber Orchestra will be featured both as an orchestral ensemble, and also as a showcase for the superb solo and chamber music artistry of its members.

Major 2018 Festival projects include two staged concerts designed by Patricia. The first is Bye Bye Beethoven, which she describes as a commentary on “the irrelevance of the classic concert routine for our present life.” This staged program features a mash-up of music by Charles Ives, John Cage, Joseph Haydn, György Kurtág, Johann Sebastian Bach, and the Beethoven Violin Concerto. Her second semi-staged concert is her own provocative commentary on the inevitable consequences on the planet of global warming. Titled Dies Irae, the program includes music by Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber, Michael Hersch, Byzantine chant, Giacinto Scelsi, and Galina Ustvolskaya’s remarkable Dies Irae for eight double basses, piano, and wooden coffin.

A new piece by American composer Michael Hersch – described by him as a dramatic cantata for two sopranos and eight instrumentalists – will receive its world premiere at the 2018 Festival, with subsequent performances at Cal Performances’ Ojai at Berkeley and at Great Britain’s venerable Aldeburgh Festival. Hersch, who wrote a violin concerto for Patricia two years ago, is considered one of the most gifted composers of his generation and is a formidable pianist. He currently serves on the composition faculty at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University. This new work is a co-commission by the Ojai Music Festival, Cal Performances Berkeley, the Aldeburgh Festival, and PNReview, the prominent British poetry magazine at which Hersch is artist-in-residence.

Additional programming highlights include Kurtag’s Kafka Fragments; Stravinsky’s L’Histoire du Soldat on the occasion of its centennial; major chamber and piano music by Galina Ustvolskaya; as well as Roumanian and Moldavian folk music performed by Patricia and her parents, Viktor and Emilia Kopatchinski on cimbalom and violin. The Festival closes with the Ligeti Violin Concerto performed by Patricia.

Purchase 2018 Series Passes here

Additional details will be announced in the fall. 

Patricia Kopatchinskaja, 2018 Music Director
Violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja’s versatility shows itself in her diverse repertoire, ranging from Baroque and Classical often played on gut strings, to new commissions and re-interpretations of modern masterworks. Ms. Kopatchinskaja first visited Ojai in April 2016 as a guest on the Festival’s off-season “Open Ears” speaker series.

A celebrated collaborator, guest artist, and chamber musician, Ms. Kopatchinskaja’s current season highlights include the opening concerts of the new SWR Symphonieorchester with whom she performed Peter Eötvös’ DoReMi Violin Concerto (with the composer himself conducting); an appearance with NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra as part of the inaugural performances of the new Elbphilharmonie concert hall in Hamburg; debuts with Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and with Gothenburg Symphonys. Continuing her regular collaboration with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, she appears with them in London and New York under Vladimir Jurowski. György Ligeti’s Violin Concerto is a particular focus of Ms. Kopatchinskaja’s current season; she will perform the work widely including with the Berliner Philharmoniker.

Ms. Kopatchinskaja serves as Artist in Residence at four major European venues and festivals: at the Berlin Konzerthaus; at the Lucerne Festival (where she will be artiste étoile); at the Wigmore Hall in London; and at the Kissinger Sommer Festival, and is an Artistic Partner with The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, performing regularly with the ensemble both in Saint Paul and internationally.

A prolific recording artist, the last few seasons have seen a number of major releases by
Ms. Kopatchinskaja. Her release for Naïve Classique featuring concerti by Bartók, Ligeti and Peter Eötvös won Gramophone’s Recording of the Year Award in 2013, an ECHO Klassik Award and a 2014 Grammy nomination. Her recently released “Take Two” on Alpha has garnered critical acclaim worldwide.

Grant Manager

Ojai Music Festival Grants Manager

Internationally regarded as one of the most influential annual classical music events, the Ojai Music Festival has long served as a creative musical laboratory for artists, composers and audiences alike to explore new and unfamiliar repertoire. The Festival uniquely combines the intimate setting of Ojai with artists performing innovative programs over an extended weekend to create an immersive experience. The Festival is committed to fostering a positive and dynamic culture among the performers, artistic staff, administrative staff, audience, volunteers, and the Ojai community. In addition, the Festival’s BRAVO education & community program actively teaches area youth about music and how it relates to other core curriculum subjects, as well as enriches the lives of the local elderly community. The Festival successfully led a community effort to raise $4 million to rebuild Libbey Bowl, which held its grand opening at the June 2011 Festival. 

The Festival’s Grants Manager reports to the Director of Development and will work directly with the President and Artistic Director as needed to write, identify and solicit funding to meet the Festival’s $250,000 foundation budget (approximately 15-20 grants annually).

Overall Scope of Responsibilities:

  • Write and develop grant proposals for foundations and other grant-making organizations, effectively communicating the Festival’s mission, programs, and goals to potential funders
  • Identify new potential sources of funding from foundations, state and federal agencies, and corporate entities
  • Manage and maintain the Festival grants calendar to ensure timely submissions of proposals, letters of inquiry, and all progress and final reports
  • Assist Director of Development to build and maintain relationships with foundation contacts and program officers
  • Ensure prompt acknowledgement of gifts in coordination with the Director of Development
  • Stay up-to-date on the Festival’s program developments and outcomes, present and future artistic plans, and organizational needs
  • Keep long-term organizational goals in mind to work to further develop and expand the Festival’s grant program
  • Be available during the annual music festival and assist as necessary (2nd Thursday-Sunday in June)

Skills, Knowledge, and Abilities:

  • A BA or equivalent degree (Music, English or Business degree preferred)
  • Proven interest in the arts with music preferred
  • 3+ years of proven recent grant writing experience, background in arts/music, (contemporary music a plus)
  • Ability to write grants for both small and large regional, national, and international foundations and entities
  • Strong general knowledge of Southern California Foundations a great benefit
  • Proven ability to prioritize and manage multiple time-sensitive deadlines
  • Reputation among funders as being a well liked yet persuasive and successful advocate
  • Able to work independently with minimal supervision and able resourcefully utilize necessary staff/resources to source information and find effective solutions
  • Creativity in finding new granting opportunities for the Festival’s unique location and program objectives
  • Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail
  • Exceptional communication and writing skills

Supervisor: Director of Development

 

Part-Time position: Approximately 8-10 hours/week with generous time off.  Attendance at four-day festival essential. Ability to make visits to Ojai office a minimum of two times per month, remote working options are available for remaining days. Compensation commensurate with experience.

 

To Apply: Please submit your resume and a copy of a grant proposal written in the past 18 months to Anna Wagner, awagner@ojaifestival.org.

The Mahler Chamber Orchestra (MCO) was founded in 1997 based on the shared vision of being a free and international ensemble, dedicated to creating and sharing exceptional experiences in classical music. With 45 members spanning 20 different countries at its core, the MCO works as a nomadic collective of passionate musicians uniting for specific tours in Europe and across the world. The orchestra is constantly on the move: it has, to date, performed in 35 countries across five continents. It is governed collectively by its management team and orchestra board; decisions are made democratically with the participation of all musicians.

The MCO’s sound is characterized by the chamber music style of ensemble playing among its alert and independent musical personalities. Its core repertoire, ranging from the Viennese classical and early Romantic periods to contemporary works and world premieres, reflects the MCO’s agility in crossing musical boundaries.

The orchestra received its most significant artistic impulses from its founding mentor, Claudio Abbado, and from Conductor Laureate Daniel Harding. Pianist Mitsuko Uchida, violinist Isabelle Faust and conductor Teodor Currentzis are current Artistic Partners who inspire and shape the orchestra during long-term collaborations. In 2016, conductor Daniele Gatti was appointed Artistic Advisor of the MCO.

MCO musicians all share a strong desire to continually deepen their engagement with audiences. This has inspired a growing number of offstage musical encounters and projects that bring music, learning and creativity to communities across the globe. Feel the Music, the MCO’s flagship education and outreach project, has opened the world of music to deaf and hard of hearing children through interactive workshops in schools and concert halls since 2012. MCO musicians are equally committed to sharing their passion and expertise with the next generation of musicians: since 2009, they have, through the MCO Academy, worked with young musicians to provide them with a high quality orchestral experience and a unique platform for networking and international exchange.

In recent years, the MCO’s major projects have included the award-winning Beethoven Journey with pianist Leif Ove Andsnes, who led the complete Beethoven concerto cycle from the keyboard in international residences over four years, and the opera production Written on Skin, which the MCO premiered at the Festival d’Aix en Provence under the baton of composer George Benjamin, performed at the Mostly Mozart Festival in New York and toured, as a semi-staged concert production, to major European cities. In 2016, the MCO and Mitsuko Uchida embarked on a multiple-season partnership centred on Mozart’s piano concertos. Upon the conclusion of a complete cycle of Beethoven symphonies, the MCO and Daniele Gatti continue their focus on symphonic cycles in the upcoming seasons.

The MCO looks ahead to a series of distinguished projects, including outstanding collaborations with its Artistic Partners, in the first months of 2017. The year begins with a residency at the International Music Festival of the Canary Islands under the direction of Jakub Hrůša, while February sees the MCO giving its debut concert in Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie with Mitsuko Uchida. The spring features the MCO’s first collaboration with pianist Daniil Trifonov, performances of Luciano Berio’s Coro under the direction of Teodor Currentzis, two tours with Daniele Gatti and the MCO’s residency at the Festival de Saint-Denis 2017.

The Mahler Chamber Orchestra has been awarded the Special Mention Prize of the German Design Award 2017 in recognition of its brand identity.

Mahlerchamber.com

“one of the most fertile musical minds to emerge in the U.S. over the past generation” The Financial Times 

 

“a natural musical genius who continues to surpass himself” – The Washington Post 

 

masterly modernist music of implacable seriousness” –The New Yorker

 

Hersch’s language never hesitates to leap into the abyss – and in ways that, for some listeners, go straight to parts of the soul that few living composers touch.” – The Philadelphia Inquirer

MICHAEL HERSCH

Described by The New York Times as a composer of works “often startling in their complexity, beauty and demonic fury,” Michael Hersch’s music been performed in the U.S. and abroad under conductors including Mariss Jansons, Alan Gilbert, Marin Alsop, Robert Spano, Carlos Kalmar, Yuri Temirkanov, Giancarlo Guerrero, and James DePreist; with the major orchestras of Cleveland, Saint Louis, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Seattle, and Oregon, among others; and ensembles including the String Soloists of the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Ensemble Klang, the Kreutzer Quartet, the Blair Quartet, NUNC, and the Network for New Music Ensemble. In recent years he has worked closely with violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, who has commissioned several works from him, including his Violin Concerto. Hersch has also written for such soloists as Thomas Hampson, Midori, Garrick Ohlsson, Shai Wosner, Miranda Cuckson, Béla Fleck, and Boris Pergamenschikow.

His solo and chamber works have appeared on programs around the globe – from the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall in the U.S. to Germany’s Schloss Neuhardenberg Festival in Brandenberg and the Philharmonie in Berlin; from the U.K.’s Dartington New Music Festival and British Museum to Italy’s Romaeuropa and Nuova Consonanza Festivals. Performances in the far east include those with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra and Japan’s Pacific Music Festival.

Recent and upcoming premieres include his Violin Concerto, with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Avanti Festival in Helsinki, and the Lucerne Festival in Switzerland; the NYC premiere of Zwischen Leben und Tod, at the newly established National Sawdust, new productions in Chicago, Washington, and Salt Lake City of his monodrama, On the Threshold of Winter, described by The Baltimore Sun as a work of “great originality, daring, and disturbing power.” The monodrama premiered in 2014 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Of the premiere The New York Times noted: “Death casts a long shadow over the recent work of Mr. Hersch … But in On the Threshold of Winter Mr. Hersch has given himself the space to burrow past anger and incomprehension in search of an art fired by empathy and compassion.” Over the past several years, Hersch has also written new works for the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Alban Berg Ensemble Wien, the Library of Congress, and Holland’s Ensemble Klang. Other notable recent events include European performances by the Kreutzer Quartet of Images From a Closed Ward in the U.K. and Sweden, and the premiere of Of Sorrow Born: Seven Elegies, a work for solo violin commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, premiered at the orchestra’s Biennial.

Born in Washington D.C. in 1971, Michael Hersch came to international attention at age twenty-five, when he was awarded First Prize in the Concordia American Composers Awards. The award resulted in a performance of his Elegy, conducted by Marin Alsop in New York’s Alice Tul-ly Hall. Later that year he became one of the youngest recipients ever of a Guggenheim Fellow-ship in Composition. Mr. Hersch has also been the recipient of the Rome Prize, the Berlin Prize, the Goddard Lieberson Fellowship from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, and many other honors.

Also a gifted pianist, Mr. Hersch has appeared around the world including appearances at the Van Cliburn Foundation’s Modern at the Modern Series, the Romaeuropa Festival, the Phillips Collection in Washington D.C., Cleveland’s Reinberger Chamber Hall, the Festival of Contem-porary Music Nuova Consonanza, the Warhol Museum, the Network for New Music Concert Se-ries, the Left Bank Concert Society, Festa Europea della Musica, St. Louis’ Sheldon Concert Hall, and in New York City at Merkin Concert Hall, the 92nd St. Y Tisch Center for the Performing Arts, and Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, among others. Mr. Hersch currently serves as chair of the composition faculty at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University.

The 2017 Ojai Music Festival with Music Director Vijay Iyer embodied the spirit of the Festival with an openness to discovery and stretching musical boundaries. This year as Vijay expressed the 71st edition was an opportunity to bring various communities together. Relive the 2017 Festival anytime by watching our archived live streaming concerts on our You Tube channel. View photos here

Feedback from our audience, artists, and members of the press is important to us. Read review excerpts, which we will continue to update as press reviews come in, or download the PDF version here.

 

[Vijay Iyer] made a festival with a history of daring and risk-taking become more vital and daring than ever. – San Diego Union-Tribune

 

The compelling feature was in what appeared to be Iyer’s own quest to find examples of how to take the next step and make the music your own.

For that he brought some of the great masters of day, with special and illuminating attention on Chicago’s Association for the Advancement of Creative Music. Friday night, Iyer presented the West Coast premiere of George Lewis’ brilliant 2015 opera, “Afterword,” written to commemorate the 50th anniversary of AACM” – Los Angeles Times

Over the weekend, we heard Iyer in multiple settings. He showed his ever-deepening attributes as a composer, most notably in the impressive world premiere of his engaging Violin Concerto, “Trouble,” for style-flexible virtuoso Jennifer Koh (whose late-night solo concert “Bach And Beyond,” melding Bach, Berio and others, was a bold highlight of the weekend). – DownBeat magazine

 

Proving once again that for the truly fearless, nothing is impossible, the 2017 Ojai Music Festival effectively erased the boundaries between jazz, classical, traditional Indian music, and more over the course of four sound-packed days in and around Libbey Bowl. – Santa Barbara Independent 

 

Improvisation and invention from two continents staked out new ground somewhere in between. Was it jazz? Maybe. But as a whole, this year’s gathering in Ojai thrived under its long-held, suitably broad umbrella of “music festival,” and an excellent, engrossing one at that. Ultimately, those are the only labels that matter. – Los Angeles Times

2017 Live Stream

Which are the best seats?
Since the new Libbey Bowl is a small amphitheater, virtually all of the seats are relatively close to the stage with good sight lines. Lawn seats are also available for those who prefer to spread out a bit. Blankets and beach chairs no taller than 12″ are allowed on the lawn. Lawn patrons with taller chairs will be seated on the right side of the lawn so not to hinder the view of others.

Will my seats be in the shade?
That depends on the time of the day. A shade cloth is erected to cover a large portion of the audience section, but we always recommend bringing a hat and sunscreen. A jacket or wrap may be needed for evening concerts.

How can I learn more about the programs?
One hour before each concert, ticket buyers are encouraged to join us for free Concert Insights at the Libbey Park tennis courts. Musicologist Christopher Hailey and featured artists discuss the repertoire and the interesting connections of the music.

What do most people wear?
Comfortable casual wear is entirely appropriate. Since this is an outdoor facility and the weather is often very warm, we recommend a hat or visor and sunscreen. A heavy wrap, sweater or jacket may be desired for the evening concerts.

Can you accommodate persons with disabilities?
Handicapped seating and restroom facilities are available. A small parking lot behind the post office is reserved during the Festival for vehicles displaying ADA placards. Please call our box office to inquire about the seats at 805.646.2053.

What discounts do you offer?
We offer college students a special $5 lawn ticket with a current ID. Students can also purchase reserved seats at a 30% discount. Children ages 5 to 17 are $5 on the lawn; children under 5 are free. The Festival does not offer senior discounts. Groups of 8 or more receive a group discount on tickets to a single concert. Call our box office at 805 646 2053 for information.

Children and Students
For concerts, lawn seating for children 5 to 17 is $5.00. Lawn seating for children under five years old is free. Children 10 years and under will not be admitted in the reserved section of the Libbey Bowl. Children over 10 receive a 30% discount in the reserved sections.

Can I come in and pick my seats?
Seating is done by our box office on a first come, first served basis, with priority given to donors and series pass subscribers. Single ticket holders will be seated in the remaining available seats. When purchasing tickets online, you are able to select your own seat. Please contact the box office with special seating requests and assistance. If you’re in the area, drop by our office at 201 S. Signal Street – we’d love to meet you!

Will tickets be available at the Box Office on the day of the concert?
Perhaps, but since we usually have near capacity audiences, ordering early will ensure the best seating we currently have available.

Can I reserve my seats and pay for them when I pick them up?
We can only hold prepaid tickets at Will Call. Tickets can be purchased with your Visa, MasterCard, or American Express.

What is your refund policy?
All sales are final for tickets and special events. There are no refunds or exchanges. In common with other outdoor venues, there are no refunds in case of rain. However, if you turn your tickets back to us for resale we can issue a receipt to you for a tax-deductible donation in the amount of the value of the tickets.

When will I get my tickets?
Ticket mailings begin in May and continue until the week preceding the Festival. After that, tickets be held in will call for pick up prior to the concert.

What if I arrive late to a performance?
Late seating is based on the discretion of the House Manager. Please note that some concerts (noted in the program book) will have no late seating.

Will food and refreshments be available?
There will be vendors for food and beverages, as well as concessions for gifts, mementos and souvenirs. You may also bring your own picnic lunch and refreshments for the lawn or our Gathering Place in Libbey Park. There is a no alcohol policy in Libbey Bowl.

May I bring my dog?
Only service animals are allowed at the concerts. Please call our box office at 805 646 2053 to make arrangements.

What about parking?
Parking is available on the streets surrounding Libbey Park and in various lots within a two block radius. All parking is free. Always allow enough extra time to find parking and have a leisurely stroll in downtown Ojai.

When should I get there to get the best lawn seats?
We open the Bowl one hour before the start of the concert. Subscribers get in first before single ticket buyers. People often begin lining up well before then. Come early, stake out your space on the lawn, and plan to attend the pre-concert lectures given 45 minutes prior to each concert. Occasionally, rehearsals may delay the opening of the gates. 

Can lawn buyers picnic on the lawn?
Yes, please bring blankets to sit, relax and enjoy a meal! As far as lawn chairs, patrons who bring camp or deck chairs are placed usually on the right side of the lawn while lower beach chairs are placed on the left side as well as picnic blankets. Ushers will be available to direct patrons to the appropriate location on the lawn. 

Can I take pictures of the concert?
The use of cameras, audio or video recording devices are not allowed during a performance.

Please contact us if you have any other questions at 805 646 2053 or boxoffice@ojaifestival.org. Thank you!

Between concerts, you can roam the downtown Ojai Arcade but also enjoy Libbey Park where you can meet up with friends, relax in our sitting areas, or have a picnic.

New this year during the Festival is our Pub in the Park, where you can have a glass of wine or craft beer provided by Attitude Adjustment. Hours are Friday, June 9 and Saturday, June 10, from 5pm to 10:30pm. (Must be 18-years or older. Prices will vary on wine, beer, and cider)

Throughout the 4-day Festival, patrons and the public can enjoy the awe-inspiring audio-kinetic installation, Rio Negro II, created by Douglas Ewart and Douglas Repetto with music by George Lewis, which will be located near the Libbey Park Gazebo. And in the Gazebo, the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) will set up shop offering free ICE Pop-U concerts with music by George Lewis, Anthony Braxton, and Mario Diaz de Leon. View the Festival schedule here.

GREEN ROOM
Another addition to this year, is our outdoor Green Room where audience members can mingle and chat with Festival artists after each concert. The Green Room will be at the the center of the park.

OUTDOOR MARKETPLACE
Take home something to help you remember your Ojai experience! Visit the Festival Pop-Up Boutique featuring merchandise from our new Patagonia® Ojai Music Festival line and Festival T-shirts, as well as essentials including baseball caps, back pillows, blankets, and tote bags. Plus, pick up the latest recordings of your favorite Festival artists. Visit other booths highlighting the best of the Ojai Valley, including the Ojai Olive Oil, Ojai Citrus Growers, Wachter Hay & Grain, and the “Inventing Ojai” exhibit of the Ojai Valley Museum.

FOOD
Need a quick bite or refreshments during intermission or before and after the concerts? Visit the Festival Grab-n-Go Market for quick snacks, including local Thacher Road Cookies, Lark Ellen Granola, and Lori’s Lemonade, plus coffee provided by NoSo Vita. Sales benefit the Ojai Music Festival.

 For details on restaurants in Ojai and other places to explore visit the Ojai Visitor Bureau here >

Special thanks to the Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne for their underwriting support to foster engagement with Festival patrons, new audiences, and the community

Freelance writer/fine art and antiques broker Leslie A. Westbrook covers Ojai and Ventura County for Ventana magazine and the Ventura County Reporter among other outlets.

She had been attending the Ojai Music Festival off and on for more than three decades. Her father –  “under the radar” jazz pianist and composer Forrest Westbrook – joined her at the Festival during the later part of his life and became a fan as well. Leslie really wishes he was still alive to partake in this year’s jazzy fest— but he will be with her in spirit. We asked Leslie for some of her favorite spots and things to do in Ojai and she has a nice long list to share:

Ojai’s downtown Arcade. Photo courtesy of Michael McFadden/Ojai Visitors Bureau

Music fans cannot live on music alone (well, almost) so what to do in-between concerts? Explore the valley and all it has to offer. Here are a few more reasons (as if you needed one!) to hit Ojai for the Festival this year.

EAT
For quick, casual but tasty Mexican, two hole-in-the wall spots popular with locals:

The pineapple tamales at La Fuente (tucked into the corner of a strip mall) are sweetly addictive, but there are six other flavors ranging from cheese and chili to corn or pork.  Street tacos on homemade rosemary tortillas at Ojai Tortilla House satisfy – be prepared to wait in line and eat on the street (no tables here), or better yet, head to Libbey Park and grab a picnic table where you can also enjoy the Rio Negro II sound installation.

Azu of Ojai

Quick nibble before the tennis court pre-concert chat and evening concert? Pop into Azu for tapas and beers. Looking for a great gluten-free meal – Food Harmonics is the new “kid on the block” right on the Arcade.

For a more leisurely meal, Suzanne’s is a long time favorite for concert goers (seafood entrees at dinner; salads at lunch); Nocciola is a wonderful alternative in town. Leave plenty of time so you don’t miss a concert to indulge in the tasting menus in this charmingly restored historic Craftsman bungalow – Bravo to owner/chef Pietro Biondi for bringing a tasty bit of Italy to Shangri-La.

DRINK
Wake UP! and smell the freshly roasted coffee sourced and roasted by the owners at Beacon Coffee Co. (new since last year’s fest) and a tasty savory or grab a cuppa java at longtime fave Ojai Roasting Co. The gigantic berry muffins at Ojai Café Emporium will hold you through morning concerts.

Midday refreshment? Grab a smoothie or healthy salads from the deli case at Rainbow Bridge – and people watch from a street side table.

The Ojai Vineyard on Montgomery Street

Pop in for a  pre-concert wine tasting at The Ojai Vineyard tasting room – we’ve never had a bad wine from winemaker Adam Tolmach. At the Festival’s new “Pub in the Park” on Friday and Saturday night, Attitude Adjustment will have OV wines available for purchase.

PRAY/MEDITATE / CHILLAX

Ojai is famous as a spiritualist retreat and community, Krishnamurti lived here – visit the philosopher’s library and former home in Ojai’s East End. Or head to Meditation Mount for stunning views of the valley.

 

Meditation Mount spectacular view

LOVE ART
From contemporary fine art to handmade pottery, Ojai prides itself on the talent in the valley. If you like what you see, plan to revisit Ojai during the annual Studio Artists Tour in the fall and visit studios and meet the artists.

The Porch Gallery shows cutting edge contemporary art, During the Festival check out its current exhibit – the Ojai Invitational 2017: “California Space & Light”, a collaboration with EMS Arts featuring selected works by Kelly Berg, Brad Howe, Andy Moses and Jennifer Wolf.

 Ojai has an earthly side, too. Contemporary ceramics can be purchased at PSpace Pottery or take a drive up and over the grade to visit Ojai icon Beatrice Wood’s (1893-1998) pottery studio, who credited her longevity thusly: “I owe it all to art books, chocolates, and young men.”). We’d add good music.

Rains Department Store in downtown Ojai

SHOP 
De Kor & Co, is a great emporium for a mix of home wares, clothing and cool gifts. Rains is an old-fashioned department store and Ojai institution. Walk on through – for men and women’s clothing and a great kitchen department! Partake in olive oil tasting at former high fashion mode Carolina Gramm’s gorgeous shop – she flavors EVOO and vinegars as well with subtle flavors. Walnut balsamic vinegar is a fav, but find your own amidst the vast array.

STROLL 
Don’t miss the Sunday Farmer’s Market – Mingle with locals and check out Ventura County’s rich cornucopia of flavorful, fresh organic produce. Nibble on popsicles in unique flavors (chili anyone?), chocolates made by a mother/daughter team, baked goods and other treats and you might even find Golden State papayas – who knew these tropical treats are raised in our region?

NATURE 
Need to stretch? Hike Shelf Road – or take a drive 3 miles to stroll Taft Gardens to admire exotic and rare botanicals from Australia and beyond.

Last but not least, don’t miss Ojai’s famous Pink Moment – the magic glow at sunset that kisses the Topa Topa mountain range.

  • Leslie A. Westbrook 

Meet Our Interns!

Back row (from left): Laura Schwartz, Cynthia Vong, Dominique Wright, Milo Talwani, Jamie Leidwinger, Andy Radford, Leilani Fiset, Emily Persinko, Jay Real, Cole Mantell; Front Row (from left): Zoe Appleby, Kathryn Carlson, Buddy, Sierra Farrar, Cori McGinley. Not shown: Clay Burton, Fiona Digney, Savannah Grinnell

Each year, the Ojai Music Festival Arts Management Internship Program welcomes 12-14 college students and recent graduates to go behind the scenes of a renowned summer music festival. We are very excited to introduce this year’s wonderful interns!

Zoe Appleby is a proud Southern California resident and student, a poetry lover, and an aspiring museum curator. She is a year away from completing her liberal arts degree at Thomas Aquinas College, a school dedicated to reading and discussing the great works of Western thought and literature. Among her favorite works are Newton’s “Principia”, Homer’s “The Iliad”, Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales”, the plays of Shakespeare, Descartes’ “Geometry”, and Aristotle’s “Ethics”. She first heard of the Ojai Music Festival while attending Villanova Preparatory School in Ojai. Last year, 2016, in working as a volunteer for the Festival, she was highly impressed by the balance of enthusiasm and professionalism found behind-the-scenes. She is excited to return to the Festival as an intern this year. The same love of beauty and culture that first drew her to the Ojai Music Festival also motivates her future career aims. She hopes, in the next few years, to pursue a graduate degree in Art History with a view towards becoming a museum curator. She sees museums as some of the country’s most important cultural institutions, preserving and strengthening humanity’s connection to Beauty through wonder.

Clay Burton began as a drummer and music producer in the LA area exploring experimental production styles. He studied at the Institute of Sonology in The Hague, NL, focusing on algorithmic composition and instrument design. This started his path in the creation of systems that make new types of music/textures at California Institute of the Arts.

Kathryn Carlson is a cello performance major at UCSB in her senior year. She is interested in pursuing new music, which she became involved in during her sophomore year of high school after being introduced to it by her music theory teacher Mr. Hertzog (composer for the kung-fu film Bloodsport). She has been a member of the UCSB Ensemble of Contemporary Music (ECM) throughout her time at UCSB and has performed in various other concerts presenting new works including the 2016 UCSB Summer Music Festival and the Beethoven, New Music, and Cupcake Bar concert put on by the Now Hear Ensemble. Recently she was awarded the ECM Distinguished Performance Award for the 2015-16 school year. She hopes to apply to a graduate school soon to continue her studies of contemporary performance.

Fiona Digney, the 2017 Steven Rothenberg Intern Fellow, is an Australian-born multi-faceted percussionist who holds both education and performance degrees and is currently based in California while she undertakes doctoral studies under the guidance of Prof. Steven Schick. She has enjoyed a wide-ranging freelance career over the last decade, performing in solo, ensemble, and theatrical settings in Australia, China, Canada, The Netherlands, Sweden, England, Mexico, and the United States. As an avid proponent of new music, she has commissioned and premiered various percussion works from composers across the globe and has been involved in many new music ensembles; most recently as on-stage percussionist in the European premiere of Anne Washburn’s highly acclaimed post-electric play, Mr. Burns at the Almeida theatre, London. Fiona has performed with West Australian Symphony Orchestra, Tetrafide percussion quartet (AUS), Ensemble 64.8 (USA), Het Zuiderlijk Toneel, and Diamantfabrielk theatre companies (NL), as well as a soloist at Club Zho and the launch of the Totally Huge New Music Festival (AUS). Fiona is a current member of red fish blue fish and is active in both the music and theatre departments at the University of California, San Diego.

Sierra Farrar recently finished her sophomore year at Westmont College, where she studies Biology and Music. She grew up in Colorado and traveled to many festivals throughout the years with her musical family; she is looking forward to adding the Ojai Festival to that list. Sierra is a violinist with extensive experience in professional chamber music, and come to Ojai after touring with the Westmont College Choir in Europe. Sierra spent a semester studying in India and learned much culturally from that experience. She is an experienced equestrian and has participated in Westernaires, a group that presents competitions between mounted drill teams.

Leilani Fiset recently finished her first year studying Photography at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. She hopes to work in the film industry as a movie photographer or a more design related field like at an ad agency. Growing up and occasionally returning to Ojai over the years has given me the experience of living in a small town and the beauty that comes with it, compared to life in a larger city that has a different kind of beauty. This has impacted my photography and my view of life.

Savannah Grinell is a rising junior at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts studying stage management and she is beyond grateful for the opportunity to work with Ojai. Recent stage management credits include In the Heights, The Golem: A Horror Opera, PlayGround: A Festival of New Plays (NYU StageWorks), and Urinetown (New Studio on Broadway). Recent design credits include Makeup Designer for The Conference of the Birds and Asst. Scenic Designer for Polaroid Stories (NYU StageWorks). 

Jamie Leidwinger is a composer and freelance contributor at Q2 Music currently living in Baltimore, MD. She is pursuing a Master of Music degree in Composition at the Peabody Conservatory of the Johns Hopkins University, and received a Bachelor of Arts in Music and minor in Political Science from Dickinson College. Her teachers include recent Pulitzer Prize-winner Du Yun, Amy Beth Kirsten, David Smooke, Douglas Buchanan, and Robert Pound. When she is not busy composing, Jamie enjoys baking, podcasting, and finding new teas to add to her collection.

Cole Mantell is pursuing a degree in History at Oberlin College. His future goals are pretty undefined right now, and hopes that wherever he end up it is full of good people and good conversations. Music has always been an important part of Cole’s life, and this past semester he hosted a radio show that played “political” music, which he defined fairly broadly, as it ranged from instrumental jazz, to antiwar music, to 90’s hip hop. He found out about Ojai through a good friend who graduated Oberlin last year and now works full time for OMF. Cole is very excited to join the Ojai team this summer and continue to explore music and meet new people.

Cori McGinley is currently entering her second year at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is pursuing a Bachelor of Art’s in American Studies, and minor in Education. In 2016, Cori was selected to be a Hefner Initiative to travel to China through the Hefner Foundation. She is the Vice President of Community Development of Pi Beta Phi, Beta Chapter, and a mentor to John Muir Elementary School with the SAGE mentorship program. Cori have volunteered or interned with the Ojai Music Festival for five years now, but she and her my family have attended the festival for many years prior. I have dreams of attending graduate school abroad and eventually earning a Ph.D.

Emily Persinko is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Music in Music Entrepreneurship and Business at San Diego State University (SDSU). She has interests in arts administration and is currently Artistic Intern with Art of Élan, Production Assistant with the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory, and Front of House Manager for the SDSU School of Music. As a classically trained flautist, Emily has 12 years of ensemble experience and is the principal flutist of the SDSU Chamber Orchestra. Emily is excited for her second summer as an Ojai Festival intern.

Jay Real is a junior at Westmont College pursuing a B.A. in Music Theory and Composition. He plans to pursue a doctorate in Theory and Composition and becoming a Professor of Music Theory. Additionally, Jay is a pianist who focuses on jazz, classical, and collaborative repertoire.

Laura Schwartz is a composer, horn player, conductor, and music theorist. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, she grew up in a much warmer place: Carlsbad, California. She attended the University of California, Davis (B.A. 2013). Laura completed her Masters in Music Composition from Illinois State University (M.M. 2015). Currently, she is a PhD in Music Composition and Theory student at the University of Pittsburgh studying with Amy Williams. Laura’s music was performed during the Oregon Bach Festival Composer’s Symposium (2014), the Oregon Symposium of Graduate Musicians (2015), Nief Norf festival (2015), and the Yarn/Wire Institute (2016). She was artist in residence with the University of Pittsburgh Department of Physics and Astronomy (2016), culminating in System Cooling, an illustrated set of six miniatures for clarinet, baritone saxophone, violin, and double bass. Her collaborations with solo performers include Sarah Pyle flute(s) and Aaron Hydns tuba. The Tuba piece she wrote for Hydns, entitled Left Out, is set for release in Summer 2017 on the album Colossus: Recordings of New Music for Tuba.Laura is interested in acoustic noise floors, Pauline Oliveros, verbal notation, and electric fans. Although she is an avid watcher of the live streamed content, this is her first time in person at the Ojai Music Festival. Lauraroseschwartz.com

Milo Talwani is a composer, rock musician, virtual reality event organizer, film production and post-production sound worker, concert sound mixer, proud older sibling, and parent to three kitties. They have been to every Ojai festival since 2009.

Cynthia Vong, flutist, is a native of Pennsylvania and received her Bachelor of Music Education degree from The Pennsylvania State University where she studied with Dr. Naomi Seidman. During her time at Penn State, she earned the School of Music Performer’s Recognition Award, was a member of the top wind ensemble and orchestra, and was selected to perform in the Woodwind Jury Honors Recital consecutively for four semesters.  Cynthia has been a featured soloist with the Reading Symphony Orchestra and Ringgold Band and was invited to perform at the Annual National Flute Association Convention in 2013 and 2015 with the Penn State Flute Choir. During the summer months, she was an active member of the Ringgold Band and the Reading Pops Orchestra. She has also performed in master classes for artists such as Bonita Boyd, Amy Porter, Robert Dick, Jeffrey Khaner, Bart Feller, and many more. Cynthia is currently pursuing her Masters of Music in performance at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she studies with Jill Felber.

Dominique Wright attends Occidental College in Los Angeles, CA and is pursuing a degree in Media Arts and Culture with a double minor in Economics and Flute Performance. She hopes to continue her track in social media marketing and expand into corporate marketing and management. This will be Dominique’s first time attending the Ojai Music Festival, and she can’t wait for the great experiences and memories. 

 

A Message from the Music Director

Thank you for joining us for these very special days and nights of music in Ojai. After two years of planning, we’ve somehow managed to gather dozens of my favorite artists: creative visionaries across generations, geographies, and histories, every one of them beyond category.

I am honored to be a featured composer and pianist throughout this Festival, but I’m even more pleased to report that it’s not all about me. You will find many other recurring themes over the weekend: improvisation and “real-time” music making; American experimentalism; radically inventive composer-performers; non-European musical systems; dialogue between the past and the present; collective struggles against racism and oppression; and central to all of this, the legacy of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM).

You will recognize some performers and composers from past Festivals (Aruna Sairam, Tyshawn Sorey, Steven Schick, George Lewis, ICE), and you will meet others whose sounds are new to Ojai (Jen Shyu, Courtney Bryan, and myself). You will meet legendary elders (Zakir Hussain, Muhal Richard Abrams, and Roscoe Mitchell) and younger upstarts (Steve Lehman, Rudresh Mahanthappa, and Cory Smythe). You will hear state-of-the-art interpreters (Jennifer Koh, Brentano Quartet, Claire Chase, and Helga Davis) and wizardly real-time creators (Graham Haynes, Wadada Leo Smith, Nicole Mitchell, and Mark Shim). You will hear music as object—composed opuses, whether finished centuries ago or with ink still fresh—and you will hear music as process—the sonic choices of networks of actors moving in relation to each other and to their environment. And you might notice that—to some degree, every musical performance contains both of these elements.

By now you’ve probably heard or read my suggestion that we should replace the word “genre” with “community”—a very different word, concerned not with styles, but with people. I realize that the latter has become a no-less-hackneyed term, wishful and forced, invoked too often. With this distinction I only meant to point out a simple truth about music: In listening to each other, we become connected. When done with patience and compassion, listening can elicit recognition of the other as a version of one’s own self. This kind of empathic listening shakes us out of our habitual role as musical “consumers,” by reminding us that music is the sound of human action, and not a disembodied substance. It de-centers “the composer” as the primary actor in music, and reorients us instead towards the shared present: being together in time. Empathic listening begins to bring all of us in, music makers and observers alike, towards a shared purpose.

Here we find common cause with Judith Butler’s Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, her recent far-reaching meditations on the politics inherent in the act of gathering. When we, as assembled bodies, are able to theorize a common purpose—to reflect upon ourselves, or to dream together, if you prefer—that is the moment that we become political; that is when we are first able to unite around something larger than the self, deeper than aesthetic enjoyment, more urgent than mere curiosity. In this sense, I would add, the moment we commit to empathetic listening, to hearing one another as fellow human beings, we immediately have the potential for not just community, but equality and justice, through direct action and collective transformation. And I am certain that such moments, such purposeful shared presence—a power stronger than itself—will emerge, here, this weekend, with and among each other.

So I thank you, once again, for assembling, and for listening.

VIJAY IYER

Click here to read the 2017 Ojai Music Festival Program Notes

omf_supper_022

Enjoy a family-style boxed dinner under the oaks in Libbey Park alongside other music enthusiasts prior to the Friday and Saturday evening concerts, 5:30pm. This gourmet boxed meal includes dinner, dessert, and wines from The Ojai Vineyard. $45/person – advance reservation required. Space is limited. Purchase online here or call our box office at 805 646 2053.

Friday Night June 9
Boxed Dinner

Farmer’s Market Tomato and Cucumber Salad

Roasted Rosemary-Lemon Chicken

Baby Red Roasted Potatoes tossed in Ojai Olive Oil

Local Farm Fresh Roasted Vegetables

Citrus Olive Oil Cake

Vegetarian Option: Stuffed Bell Pepper with Cashew Nut Sauce
with Roasted Cauliflower and Fresh Herbs

Saturday Night June 10
Boxed Dinner Menu

Mango-Cucumber Fresh Mint Salad

Cold Roasted Salmon
With lemon butter

Indian-Inspired Quinoa Pilaf

Local Farm Fresh Roasted Vegetables

Chocolate Seduction Tart

Vegetarian Option: Grilled Portabella Mushroom
with Gouda cheese

 

 

Ojaipedia Entry #1

 

This series aims to provide additional information and context about the 2017 Ojai Music Festival. 

Thursday, June 8
Evening Concert
8:00 – 10:00pm

There will be three performances during the Ojai Music Festival’s opening concert. The concert offers distinct modes of performance that rarely share a concert stage. The concert begins with Emergence, a piece for orchestra and trio, which incorporates compositional interpretation alongside improvisation. After that, Vijay Iyer’s violin concerto Trouble premieres, with Jennifer Koh as the soloist. Finally, Vijay Iyer and composer-trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith will perform selections from their recent project A Cosmic Rhythm with Each Stroke.

Emergence

To quote Wikipedia: “In philosophy, systems theory, science, and art, emergence is a phenomenon whereby larger entities arise through interactions among smaller or simpler entities such that the larger entities exhibit the properties the smaller/simpler entities do not exhibit.”

Under this definition, music making is emergence. The “simpler” entities are the individuals who exhibit sound, such as performers, audience members, the conductor, and the composer. In Vijay Iyer’s Emergence, an orchestra and a trio work together to create the music. The orchestra follows the lead of a score and a conductor (Steve Schick), while the trio members have license to improvise. If you listen to this recording from last week, you can hear the direct, emergent communication that occurs.

When the orchestra and an improvisational solo seem to perfectly synchronize, listeners may wonder, “was that on purpose?” Whether those moments are “composed” in advance or in real time, the answer is yes.

Listen below:

Trouble

Vijay Iyer’s violin concerto Trouble premieres after Emergence. In his notes for the piece’s workshop version, Iyer says, “When meeting with Jennifer Koh over the past year to discuss the details of this piece, I often found it difficult to focus; typically we found ourselves instead recoiling in horror at the events of any given day. This pattern has only intensified since January 20, as we find our communities, our country, and our planet in greater peril with each passing hour. In creating the piece I found myself both channeling and pushing against the sensation of extreme precarity that pervades our moment.” Exploring different relationships between the soloist and the group, Iyer says “the soloist can embody the relationship of an artist to her community: not so much a “leader” or “hero,” but something more like a shaman, a conduit for the forces in motion around us.”

Jennifer Koh, the Oberlin Contemporary String Ensemble, and International Contemporary Ensemble will perform under the baton of Steven Schick, Ojai’s 2015 music director. Here is a picture of Vijay Iyer reviewing the score while Jennifer Koh and the Oberlin players rehearse in Oberlin’s Warner Hall:

(a nice shot by Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris)

A Cosmic Rhythm with Each Stroke

In his New Yorker review for 2016’s Big Ears Festival, Alex Ross described Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith’s performance: “Smith presents a fragment of chiselled melody, like a pillar of a building that has otherwise fallen to ruin. Iyer answers with a misty dissonance or a ghostly filigree pattern. They create an illusion of vast space in which two solitary paths intersect. At one extraordinary moment, Smith began climbing up the steps of the major scale, as if he had found a stairway to the light; but then he let his tone crack, reverted to halting chromatic steps, and fell silent.”

Wadada Leo Smith was an early member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM). The organization’s influence emanates through the Festival, with Afterword, an opera, art installation Rio Negro II, and a performance by a trio of early AACM members Muhal Richard Abrams, Roscoe Mitchell, and George Lewis as Festival highlights. 

Click here to buy tickets to this concert

**Disclaimer**

The title “Ojaipedia” draws inspiration from our friends at the LA Philharmonic’s “Philpedia” webpage. We designed this “pedia” to be interactive; please feel free to contribute, dispute, or clarify things by emailing ksloan@ojaifestival.org. Any additional information is welcome and encouraged.

OVB_PixieMonthLogo_2014Final_WebApril is Ojai Pixie Month – one of our favorite times of the year! Years ago, over 40 local farmers collaborated to form the Ojai Pixie Growers Association.  Ojai’s unique micro-climate offers optimal growing conditions for our petite, ultra-sweet tangerines, so we decided to honor them annually in April with Ojai Pixie Month.  It’s a short harvest season though, usually March through May, so the whole community comes together and celebrates by offering Pixie-centric hotel packages, libation and culinary specials, spa treatments, retail discounts, outdoor activities and much more. Ojai offers a variety of lodging accommodations to fit your family’s needs.  Check out some of the specials below, and have fun deciding which activities you’d like to participate in!  Or, if you’d rather just quietly enjoy Ojai Pixies on your own, pick up a few at a local grocer or Farmer’s Market on Sunday, discover one of Ojai’s great hiking spots, and see, smell, feel and taste what all the fuss is about!

The Ojai Music Festival is celebrating with Pixie Passes: get up to 20% off of your ticket order!

Discount Details     Discount Code       
Reserve seats to 2 concerts, receive 10% off total order OjaiPixie10
Reserve seats to 4 concerts, receive 15% off total order OjaiPixie15
Reserve seats to 6 concerts, receive 20% off total order OjaiPixie20

Buy online and use a promo code, valid April 1 – April 30, not valid for previously purchased tickets

Pixie Month Specials – Dine, Shop, Explore and Relax

HOTEL PACKAGES:   There’s so much to do, you’ll want to stay a few days and soak in all the Ojai sunshine.  Take advantage of some of the great lodging offers below:

The Oaks: With any lodging package, enjoy a complimentary Ojai Pixie Scrub or a Pixie Pedicure. Give The Oaks a call to learn about all their healthful and fun Pixie offers.

Ojai Valley Inn & Spa: Ojai’s five diamond resort celebrates Pixies around every turn of their lovely 220 acres! The Spring Pixies 2017 package includes a Pixie massage at Spa Ojai, two Pixie-inspired cocktails, breakfast for two at The Oak, and a special Pixie Tangerine Welcome Amenity!

The Lavender Inn team loves Pixie Month and celebrates with culinary specials all month.  Guests are treated to a fresh, Pixie-inspired breakfast every day outside on the veranda. Explore the beauty of Ojai during the day, and return to the Inn each night for complimentary tapas and house-crafted Pixie cocktails.

Emerald and Blue Iguana Inns celebrate Ojai’s famed Pixie Tangerine season with the Pixie Pamper Me Package & Gourmet Gift Basket. Relax, be pampered and celebrate this Pixie season with the all-inclusive, Pixie inspired gourmet gift basket, massage, and dinner package at East End Restaurant & Bar! 

Su Nido and Casa Ojai: Enjoy the Pixie season with a 25% discount Sunday through Thursday, and 15% on Friday and Saturday nights!  The sweet taste and smell of complimentary Pixies are yours throughout your stay!

CULINARY:

Agave Maria’s Pixie Margarita anyone? Try this fresh squeezed Pixie cocktail on the patio!

Azu features refreshing cocktails and culinary specials all month long – Try a Pixie Drop Martini or a Pixie Blossom Margarita! The White Pixie Ale is available at Ojai Valley Brewery‘s new taproom, located at Azu. How about a great, messy burger paired with a cold White Pixie Ale? 

Bliss Frozen Yogurt:  Pixie frozen yogurt and sorbet … what’s your pleasure?  Best enjoyed while people watching in front! 

East End Restaurant & Bar: Enjoy a Pixie old fashioned, a specialty salmon entrée glazed with a pomegranate, pixie salsa over pesto quinoa and seasoned vegetables.

Food Harmonics: Nutritious and delicious! Ojai’s 100% organic and gluten-free restaurant serving Vegan, Vegetarian, and Paleo dishes has created a probiotic Pixie Chutney to accompany their dosas and toasts, and will be serving Iced Pixie Kefir on the patio courtyard.

Knead Baking Company:  Knead’s Citrus Syrup Cake is just too good for words – imagine a delicious cake soaked in Pixie syrup!  Knead is serving up lots of sweet and savory special surprises.

Ojai Valley Inn & Spa: Irresistible crème brulee, sorbet, and chocolate Pixie-infused desserts will be served resort-wide.  Incomparable views paired with a hand-crafted Pixie cocktail just might be the highlight of your Ojai getaway!

Ojai Coffee Roasting Company: Relax with a fresh squeezed Pixie Tangerine Mocha, topped with whipped cream and Pixie zest, or try a Pixie Tangerine Salad with grilled chicken, fresh strawberries, stilton cheese tossed wtih mixed greens and a Pixie tangerine dressing. 

Osteria Monte Grappa: Enjoy a fresh squeezed, Ojai Pixie Margarita on the patio!

Ojai Cafe Emporium: Try the Ojai Pixie Salad, featuring greens, with pixies, roasted beets, and goat cheese.

Revel: Ojai’s new Jun Kombucha Brewery & Tasting Room, releases the first ever, freshly juiced Pixie tangerines in sparkling probiotic goodness, served cold and on-tap!

Suzanne’s:  Longtime favorite Pixie Cosmo is offered, along with tasty Pixie-centric culinary surprises all month long!

Tipple & Ramble: Location … location … Step out onto a lovely patio and enjoy housemade Pixie marmalade served with the cheese boards, and on the weekends, Pixie Aperol Spritz served with a Pixie ginger ricotta tart under lovely shade trees.  Ojai at its finest!

SPA:

The Oaks:  Relax, and let the knowledgeable spa team at The Oaks offer you their seasonal Ojai Pixie Scrub treatment or a Pixie Pedicure.

The Day Spa of Ojai: Exfoliate in pixie essential oils and pure sea salts with the Ojai Salt Glow body treatment, or the Anti-Aging Vitamin C Pixie Facial to rejuvenate, moisturize, and tone your skin.

Spa Ojai at Ojai Valley Inn & Spa: Luxuriate in the uplifting Ojai Pixie Tangerine Body Polish treatment, and as an extra bonus, this treatment is offered at 20% discount.  Seasonal manicures and pedicures are also available for your rejuvenating spa experience.

Enhanced Day Spa: You’ll be exhilarated and energized by the Pixie scents in the spa! Enjoy the Ojai Pixie Custard Foot & Calf Treatment, Ojai Dreamsicle Massage, or Pixie Facial!

EarthTonics Botanical Spa: Brighten, balance, and even out your skin tone with a Pixie-infused facial, full of antioxidants! Holistic esthetician Daron Hope has created this rejuvenating facial with her signature botanical tonics.

SHOPPING:

Treasures of Ojai:  Hunt for the tangerine-colored price tags, and enjoy those items at 20% off!

The Oaks Spa:  Be sure to head over to The Nest for 10% discount on any tangerine-colored items.

Ojai Clothing:  There is a distinct Ojai style – Come check out all orange-colored merchandise storewide; it will be offered at 20% discount.

Summer Camp: The popular Ojai Pixie and Citrus Vibes soy candles, infused with high-grade essential oils, are available all month. Both are offered at a 10% discount all month long. Receive a 15% discount on any custom picture frame.

Carolina Gramm Extra Virgin Olive Oil Products: Visit Carolina’s eclectic shop and enjoy an exclusive taste of Pixie-infused olive oil! 

GloWest:  The new salon in town offers 10% discount on Ojai Pixie pedicures and 15% discount on all Ojai Pixie Candles and Happy Trail Bath Soak.  Come be pixi-fied!

Ojai Baby: Don’t forget about your little ones during Pixie Month – Baby organic Pixie onesies and T’s are a must during our celebratory Month!

Azu: Purchase a Hippie Care Package filled with Ojai specialties such as local wine, Palo Santo incense bundle, citrus soy wax candle, Pixie Tangerine Moon Valley Marmalde and, of course, Ojai’s sweet Pixies (if picked up locally)!  Makes a great gift for a special someone, and be sure to treat yourself too!

ACTIVITIES:

The MOB Shop and Porch Gallery Ojai partner to present Curated Rides for the cultured, curious, and adventurous! Riders will enjoy a two-hour guided tour featuring eight iconic Ojai landmarks. Rides are offered morning, afternoon, and early evening! Teams receive water bottles, signature glass from Porch Gallery and Ojai Pixies!

Cloud Climbers Jeep Tours:  Explore birds-eye views of the beautiful patchwork of Ojai’s celebrated citrus groves in a custom, open-air Jeep driven by a professional guide. The tour includes a stop at Ojai Olive Oil where you can sample citrus-flavored vinegars and local, award-winning olive oils.

Friends Ranch Orchard Tours:  Learn what all the fuss is about! The Pixie story is warmly shared by the Friends family.  Kids and adults are treated to samples and picking your own fruit.  April tour dates are the 1st, 5th, 15th, 22nd and 29th.  Be sure to book in advance! 

Ojai Valley Trail Riding Company: Enjoy Ojai’s wide open spaces, and take a scenic horseback ride during Ojai Pixie Month! Guests will enjoy fresh Pixies and $10 discount on all rides during April!

Ojai Valley Brewery Party at Azu Restaurant & Bar: Come taste the White Pixie Ale, enjoy Pixie cocktails and mimosas, live entertainment, and complimentary Pixie-centric food 4:00 – 9:00 p.m on Sunday, April 9, 2017!

Ojai Music Festival: Here’s your chance to purchase tickets to Ojai’s famed annual Music Festival! Classical music lovers from all over the world converge in Ojai in June, and if you purchase tickets during Pixie Month, you’ll receive a discount – the more you purchase the greater the discount!

Ojai Farmers Market: Locals and visitors gather at this favorite spot on Sunday mornings from 9am-1pm. Fresh pixies are featured by some of the local growers. Stop by, introduce yourself, and enjoy the Farmers Market vibe! The freshest fruits and vegetables, friendly people, hand-crafted wares and live music await you!

Pixie Open House at Enhanced Day Spa: Come celebrate everything Pixie at Enhanced Day Spa on April 8th, 1 – 4pm! Enjoy a Pixie-inspired, mini spa treatment and complimentary Ojai Pixie cocktails and appetizers. Shop the boutique for pixie special discounts!

Ojai Pixie Tangerine Cooking Class:  In an idyllic setting, Chef Robin Goldstein, will create and enjoy tasty dishes such as citrus marinated whitefish crudo, roast organic chicken with Pixies and much more!  Book the class, and stay for the night with a $10 discount on your room on April 9, 2017 at the Lavender Inn. 

Ojai Valley Inn & Spa

  • “Pixology” Class:  The Inn’s award-winning bartending team gives participants a guided demonstration and sampling of two cocktails with Pixie-inspired recipes.  Fridays, from 4:30 to 5pm. $25 
  • Pixie Pool Party:  Hotel guests can splash the day away during the Inn’s Pixie pool celebration on April 8th & 15th! Fun for the whole family – activities counselors will be leading fun games and offering complimentary Pixie popsicles!
  • Pixie Golf: Think you’re seeing orange?  Look twice when you see something orange on the golf course.  Not only do you get to play on a historic course but you’ll enjoy the Inn’s limited edition Pixie season golf balls!

The Ojai:117th Annual Tennis Tournament: A longtime Ojai tradition, treat yourself to exciting tennis matches on April 26 – 30, 2017.

All season, fresh Pixies are sold Tuesday and Friday mornings at the Friends Ranch Packing House, and daily at Rainbow Bridge Natural Foods Market, and Westridge Markets.

2017 Imagine Concert featuring Nestor Torres and Student Musicians

The annual Imagine concert in February was all about sharing music with students by students. Both the Matilija Junior High School and Nordhoff High School music students performed to a crowd of close to 500 local Ojai and Ventura-area elementary students.

This year a special highlight was a guest appearance by GRAMMY Latin Jazz winner Nestor Torres, who performed for the students and a surprise improvisatoin session along side the student musicians.

Photos courtesy of Kirby Russell.

 “We got to experience the excitement of improvising real jazz on the spot with an amazing player, as well as learn to listen to each other and share the spotlight to create music of our own. It also taught us to push our bodies in what we thought we were capable of doing and showed us that, just like anything else, music can be a form of communication that gives us a voice to speak our own message.”– Noah Byle, 12th grade, Nordhoff High School

“The Imagine concert is a wonderful part of the musical culture of Ojai! The middle school performers remember attending the concert as elementary school students. They tell me with a great deal of enthusiasm about the performances they watched, and they are proud to now be part of the show. In turn, their collaboration with the high school students give them a taste of the next level of musicianship. To top it all off, the guest performers never cease to expand our idea of what is possible.” — Thomas Fredrickson, Matilija Junior High School Music Director

 

Vijay Iyer is joined by a community of artistic collaborators, including returning Ojai family members 2015 Music Director Steven Schick, International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Carnatic vocalist Aruna Sairam, flutist Claire Chase, and composer/percussionist Tyshawn Sorey 

Iyer introduces Ojai to master musicians from various backgrounds and communities: Brentano Quartet; violinist Jennifer Koh; vocalist/composer Jen Shyu; Vijay Iyer Trio; Vijay Iyer Sextet; Tyshawn Sorey Double Trio; tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain; saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa; trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith; and The Trio featuring Muhal Richard Abrams, George Lewis, and Roscoe Mitchell

Highlights of the 2017 Festival include the world premiere of Vijay Iyer’s Violin Concerto, written for and performed by Jennifer Koh; the American premiere of Iyer’s Emergence for trio and ensemble; RADHE RADHE: Rites of Holi with music by Iyer and film by Prashant Bhargava; the West Coast premiere of the opera Afterword by George Lewis; and Yet Unheard (world premiere of chamber version) by Courtney Bryan

Cal PerformancesOjai at Berkeley is slated for June 15-17, 2017 following the Ojai Music Festival

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download 2017 schedule 

(November 16, 2016– Ojai, California) – The Ojai Music Festival, June 8-11, 2017, with Music Director Vijay Iyer celebrates diverse communities of music, artists, and collaborations in a weekend of stimulation and reflection.

Artistic Director Thomas W. Morris stated, “Vijay Iyer is usually described as a composer, a pianist, an improviser, a collaborator, and a teacher. What really distinguishes him, however, is not just what he does but who he is and what he stands for. Vijay believes a life in the arts is a life of service in imagining, building, and enacting community that transcends heritage, nation, and creed. The 2017 Festival reflects these beliefs in the range of collaborators joining us – from Carnatic vocalist Aruna Sairam to percussionist/composer Tyshawn Sorey, to the virtuosic ensemble ICE, to trumpet legend Wadada Leo Smith; in the breadth of roles Vijay will play – from composer, to performer, to collaborator, to intellectual guide; and in the historical and social perspectives represented by the music and artists – from how so much of the Festival’s foundation is based on the groundbreaking Association for the Advancement of Creative Music (AACM), to young composer Courtney Bryan’s powerful tribute to Sandra Bland, a vivid testimony to music’s ability to bring communities together in healing.”

Vijay Iyer commented, “When I was invited to take on the role of Music Director for the 2017 Ojai Music Festival, it was a shocking but validating proposition. As an artist, I like to insert myself into situations where some might not necessarily imagine I belong. I have many different affinities musically, and also very real associations across different musical communities, generations, geographic locations, and traditions that speak to me and through me. Our 2017 Festival feels like a good opportunity to update the idea of what music is today. I know the hallowed history of this Festival and I’ve seen different versions of what it can be. I’m just glad that Tom Morris invited me to intervene, and to bring my people with me. I’m going to learn so much over those few days in June, and I believe everyone there will discover a great deal – not just about music, but about themselves.” 

Watch Vijay Iyer Discuss the 2017 Festival

Much of the four-day Festival programming revolves around the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), an organization founded in Chicago in 1965 by a group of African-American experimentalists. Musicians of the AACM were not only committed to an adventurous synthesis of music making strategies – contemporary and ancient, familiar and faraway – but their very being was framed out of the Civil Rights struggles of that era. The New York Times, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the AACM a year ago said, “The AACM has been one of the country’s great engines of experimental art, producing work with an irreducible breadth of scope and style.”  Some of the original founding AACM members, including Wadada Leo Smith, Muhal Richard Abrams, and Roscoe Mitchell will be featured 2017 Ojai artists, as will composer/trombonist George Lewis, whose book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and American Experimental Music tells the definitive history of the AACM. Lewis’ opera Afterword, which is receiving its West Coast premiere, is based on the history of the organization.

The 2017 Festival begins on Thursday, June 8 showcasing the talents of Vijay Iyer. The program features two recent works by Mr. Iyer, the American premiere of Emergence, performed by ICE and the Vijay Iyer Trio conducted by Steven Schick; and the world premiere of his Violin Concerto, a co-commission by the Ojai Music Festival, Cal Performances in Berkeley, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The Violin Concerto was composed for and will be performed by violinist Jennifer Koh. The evening closes with a duo comprising Mr. Iyer and the celebrated trumpet player and a founder of the AACM, Wadada Leo Smith. Described by Mr. Iyer as his “hero, friend, and teacher,” Mr. Smith collaborates with the pianist on music that is “spellbinding and traverses musical identities.”

The two-part Friday afternoon concert on June 9 features flutist Claire Chase performing a selection from her recent Density 2036 project, a 22-year program conceived by Ms. Chase in 2014 to commission an entirely new body of repertory for solo flute each year until the 100th anniversary of Edgard Varèse groundbreaking 1936 flute solo. Following Density 2036 will be a rare performance by Tyshawn Sorey’s Double Trio in a program called “The Inner Spectrum of Variables.” Mr. Sorey made his Ojai debut last year composing music for and performing in the Josephine Baker Portrait. 

Friday evening’s concert features the West Coast premiere of George Lewis’ opera Afterword, for a small ensemble and three singers, performed by ICE with soprano Joelle Lamarre, contralto Gwendolyn Brown, and tenor JuIian Otis, all of whom sang in the 2016 American premiere of the work in Chicago, and with Steven Schick conducting. A 2002 MacArthur Fellow, George Lewis is a composer, theorist, musicologist, and virtuoso trombonist with an endowed chair at Columbia University. His A Will to Adorn was performed during the 2015 Ojai Music Festival. Mr. Lewis is the author of A Power Stronger than Itself: The AACM and American Experimental Music, a prizewinning, comprehensive cultural history of this influential organization and its members. The opera Afterword draws from the book’s own afterword, consisting of transcribed dialogues and testimonials about the AACM’s founding in 1965. Afterword will be semi-staged and directed by Sean Griffin.

Saturday afternoon’s two-part concert on June 10 begins with a program by the Brentano Quartet. In addition to performing the entire two-century range of standard quartet repertoire, the Brentano Quartet has a strong interest in both old and new music. The concert features music by György Kurtág and Mozart, as well as Vijay Iyer’s Mozart Effects, written for the quartet. Following this will be Conduction® led by Tyshawn Sorey, who is widely considered to be among the most important young artists at the intersection between composed and improvised music. Conduction®, is a gestural language invented by the acclaimed cornetist and composer Lawrence D. “Butch” Morris. As defined by the composer, “Conduction® is the practice of conveying and interpreting a lexicon of directives to construct or modify sonic arrangement or composition; a structure-content exchange between composer/conductor and instrumentalists that provides the immediate possibility of initiating or altering harmony, melody, rhythm, tempo, progression, articulation, phrasing, or form through the manipulation of pitch, dynamics (volume/intensity/density), timbre, duration, silence, and organization in real-time. Conduction® is a 60-minute piece of new music for an ensemble of 20 players being composed in real time – none of the performers nor conductor have a note of music in front of them.”

The Saturday evening centerpiece is RADHE RADHE: Rites of Holi, commissioned five years ago by Carolina Performing Arts at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to celebrate the centennial of Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du printemps. RADHE RADHE: Rites of Holi is a vivid and mesmerizing multimedia collaboration by Mr. Iyer and filmmaker Prashant Bhargava (who passed away in 2015 at the age of 42), exploring another sort of rite of spring, the Hindu festival of Holi, famous for its revelry of color in celebration of the love between the divine Krishna and Radha. In northern India, Mr. Bhargava filmed ravishing hi-definition images of an eight-day Holi festival, later editing the footage into a finished 37-minute film with Stravinsky’s Sacre musical structure as the basis for its film structure. Mr. Iyer composed a new score as the musical complement to Mr. Bhargava’s visual ballet, drawing at times on the rhythms and chants of the Holi festival. The result is one of Mr. Iyer’s warmest, most colorful creations to date, as rich melodically as it is texturally. The work is for an ensemble of 13 players that will be performed by ICE and conducted by Steven Schick, who will accompany the projected film live on the Libbey Bowl stage. The first half of the concert will be the West Coast premiere of a new version of Le Sacre du printemps arranged by composer Cliff Colnot for the same instrumental forces.

The final day of the Festival on Sunday, June 11 is a mini-festival of improvisation. It begins in the early morning with a free concert of living legends that will be one of the historical highlights at Ojai – The Trio featuring octogenarian pianist Muhal Richard Abrams, George Lewis on trombone and laptop, and Roscoe Mitchell on assorted woodwinds. Mr. Abrams and Mr. Mitchell were among the founders of the AACM. The afternoon concert presents Vijay Iyer and his close collaborator for more than twenty years, the award-winning saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa, joining forces with two living giants of Indian classical music: celebrated Carnatic vocalist Aruna Sairam and tabla maestro and world music pioneer Zakir Hussain. This day realizes one of Vijay Iyer’s dreams for the 2017 Festival, to create a new musical fabric with these remarkable artists together in Ojai. The Festival closes with Vijay Iyer and his all-star sextet including bassist Stephan Crump, Tyshawn Sorey on drums, alto saxophonist Steve Lehman, Graham Haynes on cornet and flugelhorn, and tenor saxophonist Mark Shim, an ensemble The New York Times has said, “addresses original music with a gripping sense of purpose.”

In addition to the main concert lineup there will be two Daybreak concerts both starting at 9am at Zalk Theatre at Besant Hill School in the upper Ojai for Ojai Music Festival members. On Friday, June 9 the performance features Jen Shyu, experimental vocalist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, dancer, and Fulbright scholar, who will perform her own work, Solo Rites: Seven Breaths. Saturday, June 10 features Nicole Mitchell, flutist, composer, bandleader, and educator. Ms. Mitchell’s music celebrates African American culture while reaching across genres and integrating new ideas with moments in the legacy of jazz, gospel, experimentalism, pop, and African percussion. She formerly served as the first woman president of Chicago’s Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM).

Free Community Concerts

Ojai continues to build on its commitment to reach an ever-broader audience, and the 2017 Festival offers two free Late Night concerts in the Libbey Bowl, in addition to the Sunday morning concert. Friday evening at 10:30pm features a recital by Jennifer Koh, entitled “Bach and Beyond” in which Ms. Koh will perform works by Johann Sebastian Bach, Missy Mazzoli, Luciano Berio, and Esa-Pekka Salonen. Saturday night at 10:30pm brings Vijay Iyer together with the Brentano Quartet to perform his Time, Place, Action. The Brentano Quartet opens the concert with selections from Bach’s Art of the Fugue, and the concert closes with the American premiere of a new version of Yet Unheard by the versatile composer and pianist Courtney Bryan. Written for chorus, orchestra, and the vocalist Helga Davis, Yet Unheard sets a new text by poet Sharan Strange memorializing Sandra Bland, a 28-year-old African American woman who died in police custody in Waller County, Texas, on July 13, 2015. Her death was classified as a suicide, though protests dispute the cause of death and allege racial violence. Focusing on bridging the sacred and the secular, Ms. Bryan’s recent compositions explore human emotions through sound, confronting the challenge of notating the feeling of improvisation. 

Ojai Talks

The 2017 Festival begins with Ojai Talks hosted by Ara Guzelimian, former Festival Artistic Director and current Dean and Provost of The Juilliard School. On Thursday June 8 the first part session topic is “The Art of Improvisation” with Vijay Iyer. The second part of the Talks features a panel to discuss “Music as Community” with Mr. Iyer and other prominent guests. On Friday evening, June 9 the Ojai Talks will be held prior to the 8pm concert of George Lewis’ Afterword on the Libbey Bowl stage. The session will feature a discussion on the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) with special guests. Additional details will be announced at a later date.

Ojai at Berkeley

Marking the seventh year of artistic partnership, Ojai at Berkeley celebrates the dynamic nature of the Ojai Music Festival and of Cal Performances. As two distinct communities, Ojai and Berkeley are both known for intrepid artistic discovery, spirited intellect, and enduring engagement in the arts. Inaugurated in 2011, Ojai at Berkeley is a joint force that enables co-commissions and co-productions and allows artists to achieve more than could be imagined by each organization separately. Ojai at Berkeley follows the 2017 Ojai Music Festival and will take place from June 15-17 in Berkeley, CA. For more information visit CalPerformances.org.

Vijay Iyer, Music Director

Composer-pianist Vijay Iyer is the Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts at Harvard University. He was named Downbeat Magazine’s Jazz Artist of the Year for 2012, 2015, and 2016, and he received a 2016 US Artists Fellowship, 2013 MacArthur Fellowship, a 2012 Doris Duke Performing Artist Award, and a 2011 Grammy nomination. He has released twenty-one albums, including A Cosmic Rhythm with Each Stroke (ECM, 2016) in duo with legendary composer-trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith, named “Best New Music” by Pitchfork; Break Stuff (ECM, 2015) with the Vijay Iyer Trio, winner of the German Record Critics’ Award for Album of the Year; the live score to the film RADHE RADHE: Rites of Holi (ECM, 2014) by filmmaker Prashant Bhargava; and Holding it Down: The Veterans’ Dreams Project (Pi Recordings, 2013), his third politically searing collaboration with poet-performer Mike Ladd, named Album of the Year in the Los Angeles Times.

Mr. Iyer’s compositions have been commissioned and premiered by Bang on a Can All-Stars, The Silk Road Ensemble, Ethel, Brentano Quartet, Brooklyn Rider, Imani Winds, American Composers Orchestra, International Contemporary Ensemble, Chamber Orchestra Leopoldinum, Matt Haimowitz, and Jennifer Koh. Mr. Iyer serves as Director of the Banff International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music.

Thomas W. Morris, Artistic Director

Thomas W. Morris was appointed Artistic Director of the Ojai Music Festival starting with the 2004 Festival. Morris is recognized as one of the most innovative leaders in the orchestra industry and served as the long-time chief executive of both The Cleveland Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He is currently active nationally and internationally as a consultant, lecturer, teacher, and writer. As Artistic Director, Morris is responsible for artistic planning and each year appoints a music director with whom he collaborates on shaping the Festival’s programming. During his decade-long tenure, audiences have increased and the scope of the Festival has expanded, most recently to include a collaborative partnership, Ojai at Berkeley, with Cal Performances at UC Berkeley. Morris was a founding director of Spring for Music at New York’s Carnegie Hall and served as the project’s artistic director. He currently serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He is also an accomplished percussionist.

About the Ojai Music Festival

From its founding in 1947, the Ojai Music Festival has created a place for groundbreaking musical experiences, bringing together innovative artists and curious audiences in an intimate, idyllic setting 80 miles northwest of Los Angeles. The Festival presents broad-ranging programs in unusual ways with an eclectic mix of rarely performed music, refreshing juxtapositions of musical styles, and works by today’s composers. The four-day festival is an immersive experience with concerts, free community events, symposia, and gatherings. Considered a highlight of the international music summer season, Ojai has remained a leader in the classical music landscape for seven decades.

Through its unique structure of the Artistic Director appointing an annual Music Director, Ojai has presented a “who’s who” of music including Aaron Copland, Igor Stravinsky, Olivier Messiaen, Michael Tilson Thomas, Kent Nagano, Pierre Boulez, John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Robert Spano, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, David Robertson, Eighth Blackbird, George Benjamin, Dawn Upshaw, Leif Ove Andsnes, Mark Morris, Jeremy Denk, Steven Schick, and Peter Sellars.

The Festival, which enters its 71st year in 2017, is a nonprofit organization based in Ojai, California. The Board Chairman is David Nygren and President is Jamie Bennett.

Remote Access to the Ojai Music Festival

The Ojai Music Festival continues to draw thousands of curious and engaged music enthusiasts from across the country. As tickets remain in high demand, Ojai includes free access to the Festival experience through live and archived video streaming at OjaiFestival.org. Festival concert archives can also be heard on media partner Q2 Music’s website at WQXR.org. 

Series Passes for 2017 Ojai Music Festival

2017 Festival series passes are available and may be purchased online at OjaiFestival.org or by calling (805) 646-2053. 2017 Ojai Music Festival series passes range from $140 to $860 for reserved seating and lawn series passes start at $60. Single concert tickets will be available in spring 2017.

Directions to Ojai and Libbey Bowl, as well as information about lodging, concierge services for visitors, and other Ojai activities, are available on the Festival website. Follow Festival updates at OjaiFestival.org, Facebook (Facebook.com/ojaifestival), and Twitter (@ojaifestivals).

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Application deadline: March 1, 2017
Download application form

bonding-2

(Ojai, CA) —  Applications are now being accepted to participate in the Ojai Music Festival’s arts management internship program coinciding with the 71st Ojai Music Festival slated for June 8-11, 2017 with Music Director Vijay Iyer.  Entering its tenth year, the Festival’s three-week program provides hands-on experiences to college students.

Ojai’s arts management internship program offers select students direct experience as they are immersed in areas of administration, operations, special events, merchandising, production, marketing, public relations, and patron services.

Students from varying fields and walks of life enjoy access to different opportunities which give them new skill sets and experiences that they take with them throughout their careers. The internship program also provides them to interact with leaders in the music industry and create lasting friendships with other students. 

Applicants must be 18 or over and enrolled in a two or four year accredited college. The Festival provides housing for the duration of the internship as well as a stipend. Applications are due by March 1, 2017. 

The 71st Ojai Music Festival, June 8-11, 2017, will celebrate diverse communities of music, artists, and collaborations in a weekend of stimulation and reflection curated by this year’s Music Director Vijay Iyer. A genre-transcending composer, pianist, improviser, and musical thinker, Iyer’s programming vision will make connections across genres to help audiences discover how composers, performers, and improvisers make music together.

Joining him will be a community of artistic collaborators, including returning Ojai family members 2015 Music Director Steven Schick, International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Carnatic vocalist Aruna Sairam, flutist Claire Chase, and composer/percussionist Tyshawn Sorey. Master musicians from various backgrounds making their Ojai debuts include Brentano Quartet; violinist Jennifer Koh; Vijay Iyer Trio; Vijay Iyer Sextet; tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain; saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa; trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith; and The Trio featuring Muhal Richard Abrams, George Lewis, and Roscoe Mitchell.

The 2017 Festival will also feature the world premiere of Vijay Iyer’s Violin Concerto, the American premiere of Iyer’s Emergence; Radhe Radhe: Rites of Holi with music by Iyer and film by Prashant Bhargava; the West Coast premiere of the opera Afterword by George Lewis; and Yet Unheard (world premiere of chamber version) by Courtney Bryan.

For more information regarding the internship program for the Ojai Music Festival, please call the main office at 805 646 2094 or email info@ojaifestival.org.  For more information on the 70th Ojai Music Festival, visit OjaiFestival.org.

 

 

Graham Haynes is an American cornetist, trumpeter and composer. The son of jazz drummer Roy Haynes,[1] Graham is known for his work in nu jazz, fusing jazz with elements of hip hop and electronic music.

With aspirations to push jazz beyond its traditional boundaries, Graham Haynes’ first foray into electronic music came in 1979 upon meeting alto saxophonist Steve Coleman. Together, they formed a band called Five Elements, which launched an influential group of improvisers called M-Base Collective. After the formation of his own ensemble – Graham Haynes and No Image – and the subsequent release of an album (What Time It Be?), Haynes would spend the balance of the 1980s studying a wide range of African, Arabic and South Asian Music. After a move to France in 1990, Haynes incorporated these far-off influences into his next two releases – Nocturne Parisian and Griot’s Footsteps. Read More

roscoe-mitchell_d200Internationally renowned musician, composer, and innovator, began his distinguished career in the spirited 1960s of Chicago, Illinois. His role in the resurrection of long neglected woodwind instruments of extreme register, his innovation as a solo woodwind performer, his and his reassertion of the composer into what has traditionally been an improvisational form have placed him at the forefront of contemporary music for over four decades. A leader in the field of avant-garde jazz and contemporary music, Mr. Mitchell is a founding member of the world renowned Art Ensemble of Chicago, the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, and the Trio Space.

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muhal-richard-abrams_d200Muhal Richard Abrams has been in the forefront of the contemporary music scene for well over forty years. Muhal is a co-founder of The Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), founder of The AACM School of Music and President of The Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, New York City Chapter. Muhal was the first recipient of the grand international jazz award, “The Jazzpar Prize”, which was awarded to him in 1990 by the Danish Jazz Center in Copenhagen, Denmark.. In 1999 Muhal was presented a proclamation by Richard M. Daley, Mayor of the City of Chicago, declaring April 11, 1999 as Muhal Richard Abrams Day in Chicago.

Except for a brief period of study at Chicago Musical College and Governors State University in Chicago, Illinois where he studied electronic music, Mr. Abrams is predominately a self-taught musician who, as a result of many years of observation, analysis, and practice as a performing musician, has developed a highly respected command of a variety of musical styles both as a pianist and composer. The versatile Mr. Abrams and members of The AACM are responsible for some of the most original new music approaches of the last three decades.

Read More